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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Chestertown in Kent County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

White & Black, Blue & Gray

Social Battlefield Split Kent Families

 
 
White & Black Blue & Gray Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Pfingsten, October 18, 2007
1. White & Black Blue & Gray Marker
Inscription. In June 1917, Judge James A. Pearce commemorated the Civil War soldiers of Kent County by erecting a monument to honor the patriotism and valor of a once divided, but now reunited country. The rough-cut and polished granite monument behind you displays the names of soldiers representing the United States on one side and the Confederacy on the other. Looking closely, you will see some of the same family names on both sides—brother against brother, father against son. Pearce said that the purpose of the monument was “to pay just tribute to men whose convictions of right and duty in a great crises of our country’s history led them to devote their lives, their fortune and their sacred honor to the cause each believed to be just and righteous.”

Pearce omitted African American soldiers, reflecting the prejudice of his day. More than 400 black Kent County residents, both slave and freemen, fought in the war, and slaves received their freedom if they agreed to serve. Most joined the United States Colored Troops all-black Federal Army regiments commanded by white officers. Some served in the more unsegregated Federal Navy. County residents, both black and white, later rectified Pearce’s omission by erecting a granite obelisk honoring the black soldiers. A dedication ceremony, led by members of the Parker White American
Civil War Monument and the "White & Black, Blue & Gray" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2012
2. Civil War Monument and the "White & Black, Blue & Gray" Marker
Legion Post 143, was held on Memorial Day 1999.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 12.537′ N, 76° 3.963′ W. Marker is in Chestertown, Maryland, in Kent County. Marker is on High Street, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is on Monument Row. Marker is in this post office area: Chestertown MD 21620, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Civil War Monument (here, next to this marker); In Memory of More Than 400 Prominent United States Colored Troops from Kent County (here, next to this marker); This Monument Honors the Area Veterans (a few steps from this marker); Revolutionary Cannon (a few steps from this marker); Common Cause (a few steps from this marker); A County Seat (within shouting distance of this marker); Chestertown, Maryland (within shouting distance of this marker); From This Point (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Chestertown.
 
More about this marker. Marker displays three photographs with the following captions: “Townspeople gathered for the dedication of the Civil War monument in June 1917.” “A wagon transported the 10-ton granite Civil
Civil War Monument, Union Face image. Click for full size.
By William Pfingsten, October 18, 2007
3. Civil War Monument, Union Face
“To the soldiers of Kent in the Federal Army, 1861–1865, Second Eastern Shore Regiment. (list of names)” Marker erected in 1917.
War monument erected by Judge James A. Pearce to its final location in Monument Park.” “Judge James Alfred Pearce served as a 2nd Lt. in local military units in 1861. He was the son of U.S. Senator James A. Pearce. To honor Civil War soldiers he erected a granite monument in 1917.”
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsHeroesNotable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Civil
 
United States Colored Troops Monument image. Click for full size.
By William Pfingsten, November 18, 2007
4. United States Colored Troops Monument
Civil War Monument Dedication image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2012
5. Civil War Monument Dedication
Townspeople gathered for the dedication of the Civil War monument in June 1917.
Transporting the Civil War Monument image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2012
6. Transporting the Civil War Monument
A wagon transported the 10-ton granite Civil War monument erected by Judge James A. Pearce to its final location in Monument Park.
Judge James Alfred Pearce image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2012
7. Judge James Alfred Pearce
Judge James Alfred Pearce served as a 2nd Lieutenant in local military units in 1861. He was the son of U.S. Senator James A. Pearce. To honor Civil War soldiers, he erected a granite monument in 1917.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,230 times since then and 6 times this year. Last updated on , by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   2. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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