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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Madison in Dane County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

King Street Arcade

Charles Huart, Architect

 

—1927 —

 
King Street Arcade Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, May 30, 2012
1. King Street Arcade Marker
Inscription. The King Street Arcade is an example of an arcaded block, a distinctive building type popular in the United States during the first half of the twentieth century. The exterior is characterized by a series of tall, evenly spaced, arched openings across a multi-story façade. The interior spans the depth of a city block, features a long central court open to skylights at the roof, with entrances to office and retail spaces along both sides, and street entry at each end. The King Street Arcade interior is intact and is the only known example of this historic building type in Madison.

Designated October 15, 2002
 
Erected 2012 by the Madison Landmarks Commission. (Marker Number 153.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Wisconsin, Madison Landmarks Commission marker series.
 
Location. 43° 4.477′ N, 89° 22.866′ W. Marker is in Madison, Wisconsin, in Dane County. Marker is on King Street 0.1 miles east of South Pinckney Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 111 King Street, Madison WI 53703, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Madison Hotel (here, next to this marker); Suhr Bank Building
King Street Arcade Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, May 30, 2012
2. King Street Arcade Marker
The marker is on the column in the middle of this photo, just below the Madison Hotel marker.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Dick-Eddy Buildings (within shouting distance of this marker); Philip Schoen Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Fess Hotel (within shouting distance of this marker); Eben and Rosaline Peck (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Peck Cabin (about 400 feet away); Hans Christian Heg (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Madison.
 
Regarding King Street Arcade. According to the Madison Landmarks Commission, "This is Madison's only example of a building type usually built in larger cities during this period. Its oddly shaped lot resulted in a five-sided building that presents two façades: one on Pinckney St. and one on King St. Typical of the commercial arcade, both façades feature a series of arches supported by columns. The building's interior space is organized around a court lined with small shops and offices and roofed with skylights. It was designed at a time when most Madisonians did their shopping downtown."
 
Additional keywords.
King Street Arcade Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, May 30, 2012
3. King Street Arcade Marker
This is the King Street side of the building, showing the "series of tall, evenly spaced, arched openings across a multi-story facade" as mentioned in the marker.
Architecture
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
King Street Arcade Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, May 30, 2012
4. King Street Arcade Marker
King Street Arcade image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, July 29, 2010
5. King Street Arcade
View from overhead showing the five sided building. The King Street side is on the upper left.
King Street Arcade Interior image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, July 8, 2012
6. King Street Arcade Interior
This view shows the "long central court open to skylights at the roof" typical of an arcaded block, as mentioned in the marker.
King Street Arcade Interior image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, July 8, 2012
7. King Street Arcade Interior
This is a view of the second floor of the interior arcade, showing the "entrances to office and retail spaces along both sides" of the central court, as mentioned in the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 311 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.   5. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.   6, 7. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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