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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Weaverville in Trinity County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Weaverville / Mountain Charlie

 
 
Weaverville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 2, 2012
1. Weaverville Marker
Inscription.
Two plaques are on this monument:
Upper Marker:
Weaverville
This town was created in 1850 by the early miners, merchants, craftsmen and worshippers as the gold mining and commercial center of the area. Here they built of brick, earth and wood the examples of white and Chinese culture that you now see. It survived numerous conflagrations and depressions to be honored in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 as a community of unusual historic significance relating to the gold rush period.
Marker erected by
Trinitarianus Chapter No. 62
E Clampus Vitus
July 15, 1972

[Lower Marker:]
Mountain Charlie
Charles Henry “Mountain Charlie” McKiernan, a native of Ireland, made his fortune as a teamster near the Weaverville mines. Business was prosperous until local natives ran “his mules” off, forcing him to move to Santa Clara County, where he continued his teamster operations among his many other ventures and became the “celestial” clampatriarch of the of the Ancient and Honorable Order of E Clampus Vitus, Mountain Charlie Chapter. His motto: “Right Wrongs Nobody.”
Dedicated November 8, 1980
Trinitarianus Chapter No. 62
and previously dedicated in Santa Clara
Weaverville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 2, 2012
2. Weaverville Marker
County
October 11, 1980
Mountain Charlie Chapter No. 1850
E Clampus Vitus

 
Erected 1972 by E Clampus Vitus, Trinitarianus Chapter 62 and Mt. Charlie Chapter 1850.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus marker series.
 
Location. 40° 43.97′ N, 122° 56.428′ W. Marker is in Weaverville, California, in Trinity County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street (California Route 299) and Trinity Lake Boulevard (California Route 3) on Main Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Weaverville CA 96093, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. E Clampus Vitus 1855 & 1962 (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Weaverville Fire Station (within shouting distance of this marker); Cameron Building Site (within shouting distance of this marker); Weaverville Chinatown (within shouting distance of this marker); New York Hotel (within shouting distance of this marker); Pacific Brewery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Weaverville Drug Store (about 300 feet away); Spiral Staircases (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Weaverville.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this
Weaverville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 2, 2012
3. Weaverville Marker
marker. "Mountain Charlie" gravesite at the Oak Hill Cemetery - San Jose, California
 
Also see . . .
1. Mountain Charley. Most colorful of Santa Cruz Mountain characters of the pioneer days was Mountain Charley McKiernan, one of the first white settlers in the region. Hunter, rancher, teamster, road-builder and stage-line operator, McKieman was said to be the idol of every small boy who grew up in the region. According to his admirers, his motto was: "Right wrongs nobody." (Submitted on June 5, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Weaverville, the little town could - East Valley Times. It is often the small towns that make America great. Weaverville, population 3,500 and county seat of Trinity, is one of those towns. Two million acres makes Trinity County one of California’s largest in size, while only 14,000 inhabitants (and no stop lights) make it one of the state’s least populated. (Submitted on June 6, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 456 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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