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Near Guinea in Caroline County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
Fairfield Plantation
 
Fairfield Plantation Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., November 3, 2007
1. Fairfield Plantation Marker
 
Inscription. The farm office across the lawn is all that remains of the once-sprawling plantation called “Fairfield.” Thomas Coleman Chandler purchased Fairfield Plantation in 1845. For the next 17 years it prospered and evolved – largely at the hands of the dozens of slaves who worked the fields and toiled in the Big House. The plantation was profitable enough that in 1854 Chandler tore down the main house and constructed a more substantial two-story brick house in its place. That house stood until 1909.

While Chandler raised his family and managed his affairs, slaves made Fairfield one of the more prosperous plantations in Caroline County. The place resembled more a village than a simple home, with barns, smokehouse, kitchen, and slave quarters. For a time before the war, Thomas Chandler’s son practiced medicine from the farm office later made famous by “Stonewall” Jackson. Fro the Chandlers, the Civil War abruptly ended the halcyon days; for the Chandler slaves, war brought the prospect of freedom.

(caption of picture): Today the National Park Service owns just a fraction of Fairfield’s original acreage. Only one building from the plantation remains – the farm office where Jackson died.

Sidebar: The main house, farm office, and other outbuildings lay at the heart
 
Closeup of Fairfield Plantation picture on marker Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., November 3, 2007
2. Closeup of Fairfield Plantation picture on marker
This picture identifies where other buildings on the site once stood, including the main building which was destroyed by fire and subsequently removed. Compare this with the picture on the adjacent marker, "War Comes to Fairfield."
 
of Fairfield’s original 740 acres. After the war, all fell into disrepair. When the R.F.&P. Railroad acquired the property in 1909, it pulled down the main house and restored the farm office, calling it the “Jackson Shrine.” The railroad donated the site to the National Park Service in 1937.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 38° 8.89′ N, 77° 26.419′ W. Marker is near Guinea, Virginia, in Caroline County. Marker can be reached from Stonewall Jackson Road (Virginia Route 606) near Guinea Station Road (Virginia Route 634). Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Woodford VA 22580, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. War Comes to Fairfield (here, next to this marker); A Staggering Blow (here, next to this marker); Stonewall Jackson Died (here, next to this marker); Guinea Station (within shouting distance of this marker); Plantations on Guinea Station Road (approx. 4.1 miles away); Stanard’s Mill (approx. 4.5 miles away); Mud Tavern (approx. 4.6 miles away); James Farmer, Civil Rights Leader (approx. 4.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Guinea.
 
"Fairfield Plantation" and two other markers Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., November 3, 2007
3. "Fairfield Plantation" and two other markers
 
 
Chandler House Site Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., November 3, 2007
4. Chandler House Site
The main building was the Chandler home. The corners of what once was the house are marked off and visible in this photograph.
 
 
Fairfield Plantation from the Railroad Tracks Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., November 3, 2007
5. Fairfield Plantation from the Railroad Tracks
Fairfield Plantation was significant to the Confederate effort due to its proximity to Guinea Station. The area became a staging area for troops moving north, Union prisoners being transported to prison camps to the south, and critically injured Confederates awaiting transportation to better medical treatment centers in Richmond, VA.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on November 5, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,509 times since then. Last updated on February 22, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on November 5, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.
 
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