“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Torrington in Litchfield County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)


Torrington Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, April 20, 2012
1. Torrington Marker
Inscription. Named in 1732 for Torrington in Devonshire, England, this was one of the townships of the Western Lands allotted to Windsor. Since the early settlers were taxpayers in that town, their shares in the division of land depended upon the amount of taxes paid to Windsor. Torrington was incorporated as a town in 1740 and became a city on October 1, 1923. Industries were established on the banks of the Naugatuck River and smaller streams, among them the manufacture of brass, needles, tacks, hooks and eyes, woolen cloth, and millwork. John Brown, noted for his efforts to abolish slavery in the Civil War era, and Samuel J. Mills, Jr., founder in 1810 of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, were born in Torrington. In 1856 Gail Borden was granted a patent for the "process of evaporating milk in vacuum." In the following year he began the manufacture of condensed milk in the Burrville section of town. The economy of Torrington remains largely industrial, with many of the earlier products continued and supplemented in modern form.
Erected 1980 by the City of Torrington, The Torrington Historical Society and the Connecticut Historical Commission.
Location. 41° 48.183′ N, 73° 7.269′ W. Marker is in Torrington
Torrington Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, April 20, 2012
2. Torrington Marker
, Connecticut, in Litchfield County. Marker is on Main Street north of City Hall Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is mounted to the front wall of Torrington City Hall to the right of the main entrance. Marker is in this post office area: Torrington CT 06790, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Hotchkiss-Fyler House (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); 1902 Constitutional Convention Pin Oak Tree (about 500 feet away); Forever Mourned / Forever Honored (about 600 feet away); James Alldis House (about 800 feet away); The Flood of August 19, 1955 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Torrington Soldiers Memorial (approx. mile away); Coe Memorial Park (approx. mile away); Torrington Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Torrington.
Categories. Colonial EraIndustry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. This page has been viewed 320 times since then and 52 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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