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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Weaverville in Trinity County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Won Lim Miao

 
 
Won Lim Miao Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 2, 2012
1. Won Lim Miao Marker
Inscription. Hundreds of Chinese miners came to the Weaverville area in the 1850ís and prospered despite hardships, discrimination and tax on foreign miners. The first house of worship burned in 1873; the Chinese continued their religious traditions in the present temple, dedicated April 18, 1874. Moon Lim Lee, trustee and grandson of one of its contributors, gift-deeded the “Temple Amongst the Forest Beneath the Clouds” to the state.
 
Erected 1980 by State Department of Parks and Recreation in cooperation with Trintarianus Chapter No. 62, E Clampus Vitus. (Marker Number 709.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the California Historical Landmarks, and the E Clampus Vitus marker series.
 
Location. 40° 43.898′ N, 122° 56.417′ W. Marker is in Weaverville, California, in Trinity County. Marker can be reached from Main Street (California Route 3 / 229), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. The marker is located on the grounds of the Weaverville Joss House State Historic Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 630 Main Street, Weaverville CA 96093, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Joss House (a few steps from this marker); Pacific Brewery
Won Lim Miao Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 2, 2012
2. Won Lim Miao Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Weaverville Chinatown (within shouting distance of this marker); Cameron Building Site (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Old Weaverville Fire Station (about 300 feet away); E Clampus Vitus 1855 & 1962 (about 400 feet away); Weaverville / Mountain Charlie (about 400 feet away); Trinity Congregational Church (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Weaverville.
 
Regarding Won Lim Miao. "The Joss House is the oldest continuously used Chinese Temple in California. Built in 1874 this Taoist Temple is still a place of worship with the alter still the place for most of the original artifacts. In 1956 it became part of the California State Parks System in order to preserve and maintain the temple's history."
 
Also see . . .
1. Weaverville Joss House - Golden State History. In January of 1848 there were only 54 Chinese men and one Chinese woman living in California. By the end of 1849 there were several thousand.1 The California Gold Rush
Weaverville Joss House image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 2, 2012
3. Weaverville Joss House
attracted settlers from around the world and a considerable portion of them came from China. The Chinese immigrants populated frontier towns and mining camps throughout the territory. One of the largest Chinese settlements in California was located in Weaverville. The town was once home to approximately 2,000 Chinese immigrants.
(Submitted on June 6, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Taoism - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Daoism stands alongside Confucianism as one of the two great religious/philosophical systems of China. Traditionally traced to the mythical Laozi “Old Philosopher,” Philosophical Daoism owes more to “philosopher Zhuang” (Zhuangzi) (4th Century BCE). Daoism is an umbrella that covers a range of similarly motivated doctrines. The term “Daoism” is also associated with assorted naturalistic or mystical religions. Sometimes the term “Lao-Zhuang Philosophy” is used to distinguish the philosophical from the more religious “Huang-Lao” (Yellow Emperor-Laozi) strain of Daoist thought. (Submitted on June 6, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

3. Moon Lim Lee - Find a Grave. Moon Lee was a prominent Weaverville resident and the last remaining descendant of the Chinese miners that
The Temple of the Forest Beneath The Clouds image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 2, 2012
4. The Temple of the Forest Beneath The Clouds
came to Trinity County during the Gold Rush.
(Submitted on June 6, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Asian AmericansChurches, Etc.
 
Weaverville Joss House Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 2, 2012
5. Weaverville Joss House Entrance
Weaverville Joss House Altar image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress, n/a
6. Weaverville Joss House Altar
Moon Lim Lee image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 1, 2012
7. Moon Lim Lee
1903 – 1985
A man who, with his wife Sue Lee, served his state, community, and cultural heritage with infinite distinction, warmth generosity, and energy. The extent of his extraordinary service was equaled only by the number of his friends and those he helped. This monument is dedicated as a tribute to all the love and benefits he bestowed upon this land and its people.
Rotary Club of Weaverville and Friends
Moon Lim Lee Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 1, 2012
8. Moon Lim Lee Plaque
Lee was the last caretaker of the Weaverville Joss House, the Temple of the Forest Beneath The Clouds. In 1956 he donated the temple to the State of California. It is now a California State Park. The Lee plaque is in the Moon Lim Lee Rest Area, about 1 mile north of Douglas City, California.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 609 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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