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Waverly Village in Spotsylvania County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

For All Anguish – For Some Freedom

 
 
For All Anguish – For Some Freedom Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., November 10, 2007
1. For All Anguish – For Some Freedom Marker
Inscription. Few communities suffered more in the face of war than did Spotsylvania County. For two years armies traversed, occupied, or fought over this ground. Most residents simply tried to stay out of the way; a few left altogether. Virtually every farm in the northern half of the county suffered damage – vandalized houses, pillaged pantries, burned fences, stolen livestock.

Most white Spotsylvanians owned small farms of a few hundred acres. More than 6,000 slaves – half the county’s population – toiled on these farms, usually in groups of two or three, often alongside their owners. With war, most white men left to fight. A few quietly supported the Union, and two – Isaac Silver and Ebenezer McGee – secretly spied for the Union army.

With the coming of war most white males left to serve the Confederacy. When the Union army arrived for the first time in 1862, slaves fled to freedom by the thousands. Farming came to a virtual halt. The women, older men, and children left behind suffered hunger and hardship, tending small gardens and sharing as best they could. Some became refugees – to Richmond, Charlottesville, or southwest Virginia. If and when they returned, they found a shattered community facing decades of recovery.

(Picture caption, top left): In 1860 half the population
For All Anguish – For Some Freedom Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W.
2. For All Anguish – For Some Freedom Marker
The "For All Anguish – For Some Freedom" marker is on the opposite side of this marker kiosk.
of Spotsylvania was enslaved, living in meager quarters with little hope for freedom. This image shows a slave family living near Spotsylvania Court House.

(Picture caption, top center): The Morrisons, wartime residents on the Salem Church Battlefield, hosted Union veterans in 1892.

(Picture caption, top right): Most homes in Spotsylvania suffered from foraging soldiers, both Union and Confederate. This image shows a house surrounded by a military camp.

There is no peace in living in this God forsaken country…
We are suffering from such lawless times as existed in the dark ages….

Katherine Couse, Spotsylvania resident, May 1864.

(Picture caption, bottom): Though the ruins of the Chancellor house came to symbolize the plight of white Spotsylvanians, in fact few homes in the county suffered outright destruction. Most homes suffered from foraging soldiers, both Union and Confederate.
 
Erected by Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park, National Park Service.
 
Location. 38° 17.298′ N, 77° 31.853′ W. Marker is in Waverly Village, Virginia, in Spotsylvania County. Marker can be reached from Old Salem Church Road near Plank Road (
Fredericksburg Refugees at Salem Church<br>December 1862 image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., November 10, 2007
3. Fredericksburg Refugees at Salem Church
December 1862
Virginia Route 3). Click for map. This marker is colocated with two other markers near the parking lot for the Old Salem Church (Civil War Battlefield) Site. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4044 Plank Road, Fredericksburg VA 22407, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Sanctuaries in Spotsylvania (here, next to this marker); Churchyard to Battleground (here, next to this marker); Salem Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Salem Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Refuge from Horror (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battle of Salem Church (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); From Church to Hospital (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Battle of Salem Church (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Waverly Village.
 
Regarding For All Anguish – For Some Freedom. This is one of five stops at Salem Church related to the Battle of Chancellorsville. See the Salem Church Virtual Tour by Markers in the links section for a listing of related markers on the tour.
 
Also see . . .
1. Salem Church Virtual Tour by Markers. The Salem Church site, surrounded by modern development, was an important site in the later stages of the Battle and Campaign of Chancellorsville. (Submitted on November 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Salem Church Walking Trail. National Park Service trail guide. (Submitted on November 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansMilitaryWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 906 times since then. Last updated on , by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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