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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Cartersville in Bartow County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Mark Anthony Cooper's Iron Works

 
 
Mark Anthony Cooper's Iron Works Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 30, 2008
1. Mark Anthony Cooper's Iron Works Marker
Inscription. These ruins of an old iron furnace built by Moses Stroup are all that remain of Cooper's Iron Works, developed by Mark Anthony Cooper, pioneer industrialist, politician, and farmer.

Cooper was born in 1800 near Powelton, Ga. Graduating from S.C. College (now the University of S.C.) in 1819, he was admitted to the bar in 1821 and opened a law office in Eatonton. A member of the Ga. Legislature in 1855, he later served in the 26th Congress, filled a vacancy in the 27th, and was reelected to the 28th. Resigning to run for Governor in 1843, Cooper was defeated by George W. Crawford and retired from politics.

Cooper bought an interest in the furnace then owned by Stroup, and in 1847 he and Leroy M. Wiley bought Stroup out. Cooper's plants, including a nail factory, rolling-mill, and flour mill, were destroyed by Sherman`s army. Cooper and Strop were incorporators of the Etowah Railroad, completed to the rolling-mill in 1858. A yard engine of this road, the 'Yonah', was involved in the famous chase of the 'General' in April, 1862.

Cooper, the first president of the Ga. Agricultural Society, a trustee of Mercer University, the University of Ga., and the Cherokee Baptist College, died in 1885 at his home, 'Glen Holly'.
 
Erected 1962 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number
Mark Anthony Cooper's Iron Works , Historic Marker, and descriptive sign image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 30, 2008
2. Mark Anthony Cooper's Iron Works , Historic Marker, and descriptive sign
008-50.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 34° 9.886′ N, 84° 44.003′ W. Marker is near Cartersville, Georgia, in Bartow County. Marker is on Old River Road 2.5 miles east of Joe Frank Harris Parkway (U.S. 41), on the left when traveling north. Click for map. The marker is located at the old furnace at the end of Ga 293 in the US Army Corp of Engineers "Cooper's Furnace Day Use Area". Marker is in this post office area: Cartersville GA 30120, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Etowah and the War (approx. 0.2 miles away); Battle of Allatoona (approx. 0.2 miles away); Federal Fort (approx. 2.4 miles away); Etowah (approx. 2.5 miles away); Friendship Cemetery (approx. 2.6 miles away); Emerson (approx. 3 miles away); Amos T. Akerman (approx. 3.4 miles away); Federal Trenches (approx. 3.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Cartersville.
 
Regarding Mark Anthony Cooper's Iron Works. Mark Cooper erected a marble monument to his creditors who allowed him to save the iron works during the panic of 1857. That monument, and two associated Georgia Historic Markers, are located in Friendship Plaza in Cartersville.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Mark Anthony Cooper. Short biography of Cooper. (Submitted on September 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Cooper's Furnace Day Use Area. Page detailing the park and sites. (Submitted on September 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Antebellum South, USIndustry & CommerceWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 3,273 times since then and 23 times this year. Last updated on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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