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Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Gen. Robert E. Lee, CSA

Army of Northern Virginia

 
 
Gen. Robert E. Lee marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 8, 2006
1. Gen. Robert E. Lee marker
Inscription.
General Lee led his troops along this road into Sharpsburg on September 15, 1862. Outmanned 2-1 he would outmaneuver the Federals on the 17th. Although hoping for a decisive victory Lee had to settle for a military draw.

Robert E. Lee was personally against secession and slavery, but decided his duty was to fight for his home and the universal right of every people to self-determination.
 
Location. 39° 27.864′ N, 77° 43.693′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Shepherdstown Pike (State Highway 34), on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Located at the Newcomer Farm just west of where Main Street crosses the Antietam Creek. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Third Indiana Cavalry (within shouting distance of this marker); Colonel James H. Childs (within shouting distance of this marker); Gettysburg Campaign (within shouting distance of this marker); 1862 Antietam Campaign (within shouting distance of this marker); Early's Washington Raid (within shouting distance of this
Lee Equestrian Statue image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 8, 2006
2. Lee Equestrian Statue
This equestrian statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee is located on the Newcomer Farm near Antietam Creek.
marker); The Newcomer House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Heart of the Civil War (about 300 feet away); 4th and 12th U.S. Infantry (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Virtual Tour of Markers along Boonsboro Pike, Antietam Battlefield
 
Also see . . .  General Robert E. Lee Monument. National Park Service site detailing the monument. (Submitted on February 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Monument Contreversy
The monument stands on a tract of land purchased in 2005 by the National Park Service. The monument was already standing at the time of the purchase and raised considerable discussion among preservation groups. Among other objections, the monument is located at a historically inaccurate location, in the middle of the Federal lines, not Confederate. But the cost to relocate the monument precluded such action, given the Park's budget limitations.
    — Submitted
Gen. Robert E. Lee, CSA image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 8, 2006
3. Gen. Robert E. Lee, CSA
This statue of Robert E. Lee was placed here by a former owner of the Newcomer Farm. A number of locals have sought to have it removed now that it is part of the Antietam National Battlefield.
February 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

2. Errors in the Original Inscription
A story passed along by the National Park Service rangers relates a typographical error when this statue was first erected. The lower paragraph stated, Robert E. Lee was personally against succession ....
    — Submitted April 8, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Gen. Robert E. Lee, CSA Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
4. Gen. Robert E. Lee, CSA Marker
Closeup of Lee statue. image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 8, 2006
5. Closeup of Lee statue.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,060 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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