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Indianapolis in Marion County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Lincoln to the Citizens of Indiana

 
 
Lincoln to the Citizens of Indiana Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mbowyer, October 1, 2006
1. Lincoln to the Citizens of Indiana Marker
Inscription. “. . . it is your business . . . if the Union of these States, and the liberties of this people, shall be lost. . . . It is your business to rise up and preserve the Union. . . .”

From speech by President-elect Abraham Lincoln at intersection of Washington and Missouri Streets, Indianapolis, February 11, 1861.
 
Erected 1961 by the Indiana Historical Society. (Marker Number 49.1961.2.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Indiana State Historical Bureau Markers, and the Lincoln 1861 Inaugural Train Stops marker series.
 
Location. 39° 46.041′ N, 86° 9.917′ W. Marker is in Indianapolis, Indiana, in Marion County. Marker is at the intersection of West Washington Street (U.S. 40) and South Missouri Street, on the right when traveling west on West Washington Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 402 W. Washington Street, Indianapolis IN 46204, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Here, Abraham Lincoln Said (here, next to this marker); Macedonian Tribune (about 400 feet away,
Lincoln to the Citizens of Indiana Marker image. Click for full size.
By Pat Filippone, July 18, 2013
2. Lincoln to the Citizens of Indiana Marker
measured in a direct line); The National Road (about 700 feet away); Site of the Central Canal (about 700 feet away); Indiana State House (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Indianapolis.
 
Regarding Lincoln to the Citizens of Indiana. The complete quote: “If the union of these States and the liberties of this people shall be lost, it is but little to any one man of fifty-two years of age, but a great deal to the thirty millions of people who inhabit these United States, and to their posterity in all coming time. It is your business to rise up and preserve the Union and liberty for yourselves and not for me.”
 
Also see . . .
1. Video - The Freedom Trail - Indianapolis. Abraham Lincoln worked as a Lawyer in the Illinois Eighth Judicial Circuit. On his "Freedom Trail" train stop in Indianapolis he was headed to Washington, D. C. to become President during a epic period in U.S. History. (Submitted on May 20, 2009, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 

2. Video - - "Abraham Lincoln Biography. . ." - (Courtesy - YouTube)::
Marker is in front of the Indiana Government Center Building image. Click for full size.
By Mbowyer, October 1, 2006
3. Marker is in front of the Indiana Government Center Building
. (Submitted on February 15, 2013.)
 
Additional comments.
1. It is Here that Lincoln Arrived in Indianapolis !
Just short of the “old” Union Station Lincolnís train stopped on West Washington and South Missouri Street in Indianapolis. It was the first major test of security for Lincoln. Colonel Elmer Ellsworth was in charge of “elaborate precautions.” The Indianapolis population then was 18,600 but Lincolnís arrival brought a crowd of 20,000 to the City.

Prior to the trip a Circular of Instructions was sent to all the reception committees at the various locations where stops were scheduled. “The President Elect will under no circumstances attempt to pass through any crowd until such arrangements are made and approved by Col. Ellsworth.”

Thusly, Lincolnís train was to stop outside Union Station for better crowd control and security. Horse-drawn carriages took Lincoln and his entourage to the Bates House to spend the night.

Colonel Ellsworth breathed a sigh of relief when Lincoln was safely boarded the train again (in Union Station) the next morning where Mary Lincoln and the children, Willie
"Old" Union Station - Indianapolis, Indiana image. Click for full size.
Courtesy Bass Photo Collection, Indiana Historical Society
4. "Old" Union Station - Indianapolis, Indiana
This is he first Union Station in the United States. It opened September 28, 1853 serving seven railroads. By 1870 over 100 trains a day passed through. In 1890 this structure was replaced with the current Romanesque Design Indianapolis Union Station.
and Tad, first joined up with Abraham—after an all night ride on a sleeper train car to catch up with Abraham in Indianapolis as a birthday surprise.

—From Colonel Elmer Ellsworth by Ruth Painter Randall, pages 212–214.
    — Submitted December 7, 2007, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.

 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
Post Card Photo of Old Indianapolis Union Station image. Click for full size.
By Courtsey - Indiana News Company - Post Card, Unknown
5. Post Card Photo of Old Indianapolis Union Station
Bates House (Hotel) - Indianapolis, Indiana image. Click for full size.
Courtesy:: Bass Photo Collection, Indiana Historical Society, Circa 1890
6. Bates House (Hotel) - Indianapolis, Indiana
The Bates House Hotel entry is to the right in the photo. (Note the possible - 'balcony' existing on the building by the parked street car.) Abraham Lincoln was taken to Bates House on February 11, 1861 for an over-night stay, reception, and a speech given from the Bates House 'balcony'. (The next day was Lincoln's Birthday, when he awoke in the Bates House Hotel.)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by M. Bowyer of Indianapolis, Indiana. This page has been viewed 4,109 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by M. Bowyer of Indianapolis, Indiana.   2. submitted on , by Pat Filippone of Stockton, California.   3. submitted on , by M. Bowyer of Indianapolis, Indiana.   4. submitted on , by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.   5. submitted on , by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.   6. submitted on , by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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