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Judiciary Square in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
Chief Justice John Marshall
Civil War to Civil Rights

Downtown Heritage Trail
 
Chief Justice John Marshall Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, June 2, 2012
1. Chief Justice John Marshall Marker
 
Inscription. A bronze likeness of Chief Justice John Marshall, visible on your way to the next Heritage Trail sign, keeps watch over John Marshall Park to your right. Marshall is remembered for molding the U.S. Supreme Court into today's authoritative body. Appointed by President John Adams, Marshall served a record 34 years until his death in 1835. He participated in more than 1,000 decisions, including the 1803 Marbury v. Madison, which defined the court's authority to declare "unconstitutional" laws passed by Congress.

John Marshall Park replaced John Marshall Place (originally 4½ Street), a few blocks of small shops and law offices that once linked Washington's first City Hall/Courthouse with Pennsylvania Avenue.

The monumental buildings and sweeping views here along Pennsylvania Avenue are the result of city planner Peter C. (a.k.a. Pierre) L'Enfant's grand 1791 vision for the Nation's Capital. But in the early 1800s, when Congress met only a few months annually, this stretch of Washington's main street was known as "Hash Row," lined with boarding houses and hotels serving members of Congress and individuals doing business with the Federal Government. Guests at Elizabeth Peyton's boarding house on this spot included Chief Justice Marshall and Senator Henry Clay.

A number of photographers recorded city business
 
Hotels on Pennsylvania Avenue Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, June 2, 2012
2. Hotels on Pennsylvania Avenue
The bunting-draped hotel at left replaced a "Hash Row" boarding house on the corner of Pennsylvania Ave. and 4 ½ St., approximately on this spot. Sen. Henry Clay, upper right, once boarded there. The United States Hotel, once one block east of here, advertized reasonable rates around 1880.
 
and ceremonial life here as well. C.M. Bell's studio of the late 1800s rivaled Mathew Brady's for portraits of Washington notables and distinguished visitors. Bell became known especially for photographing hundreds of American Indians in town for treaty negotiations.

To reach Sign e.2 at the corner of Sixth Street and Indiana Avenue, please proceed north along the John Marshall Park walkway past the statue of Marshall by William Wetmore Story,then turn left on C Street and right on Sixth.

(Back):
The Civil War (1861 - 1865) transformed Washington, DC from a muddy backwater to a center of national power. Ever since, the city has been at the heart of the continuing struggle to realize fully the ideas for which the war was fought. The 25 signs that mark this trail follow the footsteps of Abraham Lincoln, Walt Whitman, Clara Barton, Frederick Douglas, and others, famous and humble, who shaped a nation and its capital city while living and working in historic downtown DC.

Civil War to Civil Rights Downtown Heritage Trail is an Official Washington, DC Walking Trail. The self-guided tour consists of three distinct loops: West, Center, and East. Each one-mile loop offers about an hour of gentle exercise.

A free booklet capturing the trail's highlights is available at local businesses and institutions along the way. To download the
 
Chief Justice John Marshall Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, June 2, 2012
3. Chief Justice John Marshall
Portrait of Justice Marshall, by Robert Matthew Sully. The advertizement for the United States Hotel appears to the left.
 
free Civil War to Civil Rights Audio Tour, and learn about other DC neighborhoods, please visit www.CuturalTourismDC.org.
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number e.1.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Civil War to Civil Rights marker series.
 
Location. 38° 53.541′ N, 77° 1.073′ W. Marker is in Judiciary Square, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Constitution / Pennsylvania Avenue, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Located at the southwest edge of John Marshall Park. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20001, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Embassy of Canada, Washington, DC (within shouting distance of this marker); John Marshall (within shouting distance of this marker); Washington City Spring (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pennsylvania Avenue (about 400 feet away); Major General George G. Meade Memorial (about 400 feet away); Andrew W. Mellon (about 500 feet away); National Grange (about 700 feet away); Protecting Consumers and Competition (about 700 feet away).
 
John Marshall Place Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, June 2, 2012
4. John Marshall Place
Lawyer John Barthel, below, lived and worked at John Marshall Place, left, (now John Marshall Park) around 1906.
 
 
C.M. Bell, Photographic Artist Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, June 2, 2012
5. C.M. Bell, Photographic Artist
Photographer C.M. Bell's portrait of Fire Lightning, right, and his studio's logo, above.
 
 
Back of Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, June 2, 2012
6. Back of Marker
 
 
Pennsylvania Avenue, circa 1853 Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, June 2, 2012
7. Pennsylvania Avenue, circa 1853
This creative concept for paving Pennsylvania Ave. captures buildings that existed in 1853, including the National Hotel at left, which once occupied the corner of Sixth St. where the Newseum is today. The Capitol's original, modest dome is seen at center.
 
 
Map of the Downtown Heritage Trail System Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, June 2, 2012
8. Map of the Downtown Heritage Trail System
 
 
Chief Justice John Marshall Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, June 2, 2012
9. Chief Justice John Marshall Marker
 
 
Chief Justice John Marshall Statue Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, June 2, 2012
10. Chief Justice John Marshall Statue
 
 
John Marshall Photo, Click for full size
By Allen C. Browne, January 18, 2014
11. John Marshall
Close-up of W.W. Story's 1883 statue of John Marshall
 
 
W. W. Story, Roma 1883 Photo, Click for full size
By Allen C. Browne, January 18, 2014
12. W. W. Story, Roma 1883
Signature of William Wetmore Story (1819-1895) on The John Marshall statue.
 
 
John Marshall Photo, Click for full size
By Allen C. Browne, January 18, 2014
13. John Marshall
Oil on canvas (1809-1810) by Cephas Thompson. Painting in the National Portrait Gallery (NPG.2010.48)
 
 
Chess Players Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, June 2, 2012
14. Chess Players
Other outdoor artwork in John Marshall Park.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on June 17, 2012, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 337 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on June 17, 2012, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 1, 2012, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   6. submitted on June 17, 2012, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on July 1, 2012, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   11, 12, 13. submitted on January 19, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   14. submitted on July 1, 2012, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
 
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