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San Francisco in San Francisco City and County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

“The Holocaust”

by George Segal

 
 
"The Holocaust" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 18, 2009
1. "The Holocaust" Marker
Inscription. We will never forget the genocidal slaughter of six million Jews, including one and a half million children in the Nazi Holocaust of 1933-1945.

We will never forget the cruel apathy of a world which allowed that Holocaust and the deliberate murder of millions of other people to happen.

We will never forget the martyrs of that evil abyss in human history. Nor will we forget those Jews and the righteous of all faiths who resisted and fought that evil.

In the memory of those and martyrs and fighters, we pledge our lives to the creation of a world in which such evil and such apathy will not be tolerated.

It is with that memory and that resolve that we dedicate this memorial.

[Hebrew, with the translation directly below, as on the marker]
בזיכרונה סוד הגאולה

In Remembrance is the Secret of Redemption

Dedicated November 7, 1984
San Francisco
 
Erected 1984.
 
Location. 37° 47.136′ N, 122° 29.997′ W. Marker is in San Francisco, California, in San Francisco City and County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of
The Holocaust Memorial - Seen from El Camino del Mar image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 18, 2009
2. The Holocaust Memorial - Seen from El Camino del Mar
34th Avenue and El Camino del Mar. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: San Francisco CA 94121, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Frances E. Willard (a few steps from this marker); The Arrival of the First Japanese Naval Ship (within shouting distance of this marker); Western Terminus of the Lincoln Highway (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Historic Shipwrecks - Lost at the Golden Gate (approx. ¼ mile away); China Beach (approx. half a mile away); Navigating the Golden Gate - Bonfires, buoys, and foghorns (approx. 0.6 miles away); Heavy Cruiser USS San Francisco (CA38) (approx. 0.6 miles away); This Memorial to Rear Admiral Daniel J. Callaghan (approx. 0.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in San Francisco.
 
More about this marker. The Holocaust Memorial is located on the grounds of the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park. The marker is situated on a low wall, behind and above the memorial sculpture.
 
Regarding "The Holocaust". The whitened-bronze sculptural tableau is enclosed by a high concrete wall on three sides, and a low wall on the west side on which the viewer may sit and contemplate the sculpture.

The memorial is a frequent target
"The Holocaust" Marker and Accompanying Interpretive Text image. Click for full size.
April 18, 2009
3. "The Holocaust" Marker and Accompanying Interpretive Text
Mounted on the wall with the marker are three additional interpretive panels. The text of these panels accompanies the following pictures.
of vandals, having been defaced at least three times in the latter part of 2008, alone.
 
Also see . . .
1. George Segal, sculptor of ‘Holocaust’ work, dies at 75. Jweekly.com's obituary of sculptor George Segal. Contains an overview of his life and work, with a particular emphasis on the San Francisco Holocaust Memorial. (Submitted on April 22, 2009.) 

2. In Fitting Memory: The Art and Politics of Holocaust Memorials. Stanford University Libraries and Academic Information Resources' introduction to an exhibit by Sybil Milton and Ira Nowinski, discussing Holocaust memorials. Numerous photos, including one of the mock-up that Segal used to produce the San Francisco Holocaust Memorial. (Submitted on April 22, 2009.) 
 
Categories. Notable EventsWar, World II
 
"The Holocaust" image. Click for full size.
April 18, 2009
4. "The Holocaust"
{Text from first interpretive panel:} The enormity of the Holocaust cannot easily be grasped. The names of these concentration camps and killing centers provide some dimension. They also serve as a symbolic memorial for the survivors, their families and others in the community, whose family members were murdered at these sites.

"The Holocaust" image. Click for full size.
April 18, 2009
5. "The Holocaust"
{text of first panel continued...}
Auschwitz-Birkenau, Sobibor, Bergen Belsen, Transnistria, Lwow-Janowska, Westerbork, Jasenovac, Warsaw, Klooga, Dachau, Buchenwald, Mauthausen, Ponary, Madjanek, Ravensbruck, Theresienstadt, Drancy, Treblinka, Stutthof, Breendonck, Chelmno, Babi Yar, Belzec
"The Holocaust" image. Click for full size.
April 18, 2009
6. "The Holocaust"
{Text of the second interpretive panel:}
This memorial stands as eternal testimony to the Holocaust perpetrated against the Jews by Nazi Germany and its collaborators from 1933-1945.
The Holocaust began with the passage of restrictive laws and a campaign of brutal anti-Semitism, continued with the forced confinement in ghettos and mass deportation of Jews to concentration and death camps, and culminated in slave labor, mass executions and gas chambers.
"The Holocaust" image. Click for full size.
April 18, 2009
7. "The Holocaust"
{Text of second panel continues...}
The systematic slaughter of millions of Jews and other victims who perished was abetted by a world that stood idly by.
In the aftermath, those rare brave individuals who defied the Nazis and risked their lives to rescue Jews were designated as "righteous among the nations."
"The Holocaust" image. Click for full size.
April 18, 2009
8. "The Holocaust"
{Remaining text of the second panel...}
The Nazi campaign ultimately failed. Yet two out of every three Jews in Europe perished and thousands of Jewish communities were destroyed.

"The Holocaust" image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 18, 2009
9. "The Holocaust"
{Text of the third panel...}
The sculpture before you is a tribute to the indomitable spirit of an ancient people who rose from the ashes of near extinction and passed on the gift of life to future generations.

Crimes of such immensity must never be forgotten.

Never Say There is No Hope
(Song of Jewish Resistance Fighters, 1943)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 1,830 times since then and 14 times this year. Last updated on . Photos:   1. submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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