“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Chidester in Ouachita County, Arkansas — The American South (West South Central)

1st Kansas Colored Infantry

1st Kansas Colored Infantry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Adrianne M. Toney, M.A., June 20, 2012
1. 1st Kansas Colored Infantry Marker
The Battle Cry as the Union Soldier fled the battle field on April 18, 1864 was, "Remember Poison Spring". We Remembered.
Inscription. The 1st Kansas Colored Infantry, a regiment that included many former Arkansas slaves, was formed in August 1862, the first black unit recruited during the war. 1st Kansas troops were the first black men to see combat, losing 10 killed and 12 wounded in a victory at Island Mound, Mo., Oct. 28, 1862. Victories at Cabin Creek and Honey Springs, Indian Territory, followed in 1863. The 1st Kansas lost 117 dead and 65 wounded at Poison Spring, Ark., April 18, 1864; many men were slain as they lay wounded after the battle, killed by Confederate troops.
Erected 2011 by Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission, Zion Hill Human Services Agency, Arkansas Natural and Cultural Resources Council. (Marker Number 25.)
Marker series. This marker is included in the Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission marker series.
Location. 33° 35.731′ N, 92° 53.574′ W. Marker is in Chidester, Arkansas, in Ouachita County. Marker is on State Highway 24, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. When heading South on Hwy 24 the Marker and American Flag are to the immediate left of Bragg Lake. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4279 1/2 Hwy 24, Chidester AR 71726, United States of America.
More about this marker.
1st Kansas Colored Infantry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Adrianne M. Toney, M.A., June 20, 2012
2. 1st Kansas Colored Infantry Marker
The marker has been placed on private property donated by Mr. Early Foremen and Family for the establishment of Uncommon Valor Memorial Park.
Regarding 1st Kansas Colored Infantry. The significance of this marker is monumental, as it recognizes the 1st Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry as the "First" men of color to see battle in the Civil War and more specifically their participation in the Battle of Poison Spring which took place in Ouachita County where the marker now is placed.
Also see . . .  Free to Fight. Part of the New York Times’ “Disunion” series, Nicole Etcheson’s article (11/1/2012) tells the story of the 1st Kansas Colored regiment. On the battle at Poison Spring, “... At Poison Spring, Ark., in April 1864, Confederates under John S. Marmaduke cut off a Union foraging party and forced it to retreat. Many of the Union wounded and captured were killed by the Confederates. Colonel Williams heard ‘the most positive assurances from eye-witnesses’ that black troops ‘were murdered on the spot.’ The First Kansas lost 117 men, either killed outright or missing and presumed dead. ‘Remember Poison Spring!’ became the rallying cry of other black Kansas regiments. By the end of the war, the regiment’s losses had mounted to 156 men and five officers, all killed in action, with another 165 soldiers succumbing to disease, making it the regiment first among Kansas regiments for the number of men lost.” (Submitted on November 1, 2012.) 
Categories. African AmericansWar, US Civil
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Adrianne M. Toney, M.A. of Camden, Arkansas. This page has been viewed 902 times since then and 138 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Adrianne M. Toney, M.A. of Camden, Arkansas. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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