“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Boston in Suffolk County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)

John Quincy Adams

John Quincy Adams Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Simmons, June 2012
1. John Quincy Adams Marker
John Quincy Adams
Sixth president of the United States
Lived in a house which stood on this site
Here his son
Charles Francis Adams
Was born in 1807
Minister to Great Britain
During the Civil War 1861-5

Erected 1925 by The City of Boston.
Location. 42° 21.138′ N, 71° 3.864′ W. Marker is in Boston, Massachusetts, in Suffolk County. Marker is on Boylston Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 62 Boylston Street, Boston MA 02116, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Emerson Majestic Theatre (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Commodore John Barry (approx. ¼ mile away); Soldiers and Sailors Monument (approx. ¼ mile away); The Cocoanut Grove (approx. ¼ mile away); The Lafayette Mall (approx. ¼ mile away); North Sea Mine Force Memorial (approx. ¼ mile away); The Hull Mint (approx. 0.3 miles away); Power System of Boston’s Rapid Transit (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Boston.
Also see . . .  John Quincy Adams (Wikipedia). (Submitted on June 21, 2012, by Bryan Simmons of Attleboro, Massachusetts.)
John Quincy Adams Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Simmons, June 2012
2. John Quincy Adams Marker

Categories. Notable PersonsPolitics
John Quincy Adams<br>Sixth President, 1825–29 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
3. John Quincy Adams
Sixth President, 1825–29
This 1850 portrait of John Quincy Adams by George Caleb Bingham (after an 1844 original) hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“John Quincy Adams's tenure as James Monroe's secretary of state ranks among the most productive In the history of that office. But Adams's often tactless ways were ill-suited for the presidency, and when his vision for such items as a comprehensive national transportation system met with hostility in Congress, he would not compromise. As a result, his administration's accomplishments were meager. But Adams was not through with political life. Elected to the House of Representatives in 1830, he served there until his death. In his prolonged and successful struggle defending the antislavery movement's right to petition Congress, ‘Old Man Eloquent‘ had gained a circle of admirers that extended well beyond his Massachusetts constituency.

When Adams sat for this portrait, he doubted that artist George Caleb Bingham could produce ‘a strong likeness.’ But Bingham did just that, and the portrait's vitality seems to echo Ralph Waldo Emerson's comment that the aging Adams was ‘like one of those old cardinals, who as quick as he is chosen Pope, throws away his crutches and his crookedness, and is as straight as a boy.’” — National Portrait Gallery
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bryan Simmons of Attleboro, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 336 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Bryan Simmons of Attleboro, Massachusetts.   3. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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