Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lewiston in Niagara County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of Queenston Heights

War of 1812

 

—October 13, 1812 —

 
The Battle of Queenston Heights Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 11, 2012
1. The Battle of Queenston Heights Marker
Inscription. On this day, Major General Stephen Van Rensselaer launched a U.S. attack on British Canada with an assault force of regulars and militia. Initially they were pinned down along the shore until Captain John Ellis Wool and his men scaled the heights using the fisherman's path and positioned themselves behind the British. The redan was overwhelmed and the British retreated. The U.S. colors were unfuried triumphantly in victory. Later that afternoon, British Major General Roger Hale Sheaffe, with one thousand fresh troops plus friendly Indians, outflanked the U.S. forces. Faced with low ammunition and no re-enforcements for his tired men, Lt. Col. Winfield Scott arranged the surrender of his troops.

The British victory was subdued with the loss of their brilliant commander, Major General Isaac Brock.
 
Erected 1994 by Moose Lodge #584, American Legion #1083, V.F.W. #7487.
 
Location. 43° 10.391′ N, 79° 2.949′ W. Marker is in Lewiston, New York, in Niagara County. Marker is on Center Street west of North Water Street, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. This historic marker is affixed to a large boulder, in a community park, that is located along the American shoreline of the Niagara River.
The Battle of Queenston Heights Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 11, 2012
2. The Battle of Queenston Heights Marker
View of the historic marker affixed to a large boulder, with the Seaway Trail marker in the background, and in the distant background is the Canadian shoreline on the other side of the Niagara River.
It is situated along the roadway/walkway that runs down to the Niagara River. Marker is in this post office area: Lewiston NY 14092, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Battle of Queenston Heights (here, next to this marker); Freedom Crossing Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Freedom Crossing Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Barton House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hennepin Park (approx. ¼ mile away); The Cibola Anchor (approx. 0.4 miles away); Little Yellow House - 1816 (approx. 0.4 miles away); Kiwanians Promoting Peace (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Lewiston.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle for Queenston Heights. This is a link to information provided by a War of 1812 site. (Submitted on July 2, 2012, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

2. Battle of Queenston Heights, 13 October 1812. This is a link to information provided by Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on July 2, 2012, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. War of 1812
 
The Battle of Queenston Heights Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 11, 2012
3. The Battle of Queenston Heights Marker
View of the historic marker in the right foreground and in the distant background, on the other side of the Niagara River, is a view of the Queenston Heights.
The Battle of Queenston Heights image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 11, 2012
4. The Battle of Queenston Heights
View from the American shore at the base of the historic marker, looking across the Niagara River towards the Queenston Heights, where the Brock Monument can be seen on the crest of the heights.
Stephen Van Rensselaer III<br>(1764-1839) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 15, 2017
5. Stephen Van Rensselaer III
(1764-1839)
This c. 1825-35 portrait of Stephen Van Rensselaer III (1764-1839) by John Wesley Jarvis hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“A scion to one of New York's richest families, Stephen Van Rensselaer was the eighth and last patroon of a vast estate between Rensselaer and Albany counties in upstate New York. At age twenty-one he inherited 1,200 square miles of land that he filled with tenant farmers, replicating a Dutch feudal pattern of land-ownership that his tenants challenged.

Van Rensselaer spent most of his career in politics, serving as lieutenant governor of New York from 1795 to 1801. During the War of 1812 he was named commander in chief of the New York militia; his military shortcomings were exposed, however, and his troops were mauled at the Battle of Queenston Heights. Humiliated, he resigned his office. Thereafter he served four congressional terms and helped found Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York.

John Wesley Jarvis, the painter of this work, was one of the most prominent portraitists in New York during the early nineteenth century.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 433 times since then and 56 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   5. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on February 27, 2017.
Paid Advertisement