“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gap in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)

Great Minquas Path

Great Minquas Path Marker image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, February 24, 2008
1. Great Minquas Path Marker
Inscription. An Indian trail, which was later the original Conestoga Road, passed through Gap, half a mile south of here. Over it, in the 17th century Minquas(Conestoga) Indians carried quantities of beaver skins from the Susquehanna Valley to trading post near Philadelphia.
Erected 1947 by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
Location. 39° 59.508′ N, 76° 1.208′ W. Marker is in Gap, Pennsylvania, in Lancaster County. Marker is on Lincoln Highway (U.S. 30) 0.3 miles west of White Horse Road PA 897, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in front of the McDonald's Restaurant. Marker is in this post office area: Gap PA 17527, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. William Chester Ruth (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Kinzer (approx. 2.7 miles away); Christiana Riot Monument (approx. 2.9 miles away); The Christiana Riot (approx. 3.9 miles away); Leacock Presbyterian Church (approx. 6.8 miles away); Strasburg Rail Road (approx. 7.5 miles away); Pennsylvania Railroad No. 460 (approx. 7.5 miles away); Pennsylvania Railroad No. 7688 (approx. 7.5 miles away).
Additional comments.
1. The Conestoga Road
The Conestoga Road, (US Route #30) Has several names as it routes its way through the United States. Names like Lincoln Highway, Lancaster Pike, and others. This road goes from coast to coast. It is the second longest road in the country at just over 3000 miles. It streaches from Atlantic City, New Jersey through large and small towns all the way to Astoria, Oregon.
    — Submitted March 19, 2011, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania.

Categories. Colonial EraNative AmericansRoads & Vehicles
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,508 times since then and 181 times this year. Photo   1. submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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