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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Davis in Yolo County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Site of the Jerome C. and Mary Chiles Davis Homestead

 
 
Site of the Jerome C. and Mary Chiles Davis Homestead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Adrian Gabriel, July 3, 2012
1. Site of the Jerome C. and Mary Chiles Davis Homestead Marker
Inscription. Two olive and two fig trees survive from the Davis’ prize-winning farm of the 1850’s. Nearby also stand some of the original shingled buildings of the University State Farm, located here in 1906. From this nucleus, the University Farm has grown to become a diversified campus of the University of California.
 
Erected by Davis Historical and Landmark Commission.
 
Location. 38° 32.42′ N, 121° 44.84′ W. Marker is near Davis, California, in Yolo County. Marker can be reached from Peter J. Shields Avenue 0.1 miles west of A Street, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. The marker is located on the University of California - Davis campus in a courtyard north of Sproul Hall and east of Olson Hall. Marker is in this post office area: Davis CA 95616, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dresbach-Hunt-Boyer Mansion (approx. 0.4 miles away); Davis Subway (approx. 0.4 miles away); Lincoln Highway Marker (approx. 0.4 miles away); Site of the First Yolo County Public Library Branch (approx. 0.4 miles away); Historic City Hall (approx. half a mile away);
The Jerome C. and Mary Chiles Davis Homestead Marker, Olson Hall at left image. Click for full size.
By Adrian Gabriel, July 3, 2012
2. The Jerome C. and Mary Chiles Davis Homestead Marker, Olson Hall at left
Remembering the Terminal Hotel Building (approx. half a mile away); Briggs Reservoir (approx. 0.8 miles away); Solano House (approx. 0.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Davis.
 
Regarding Site of the Jerome C. and Mary Chiles Davis Homestead. Jerome C. Davis originally came out to California with John C. Frémont's Third Expedition in 1845-1846. He was from Ohio, but met up with Frémont in St. Louis, Missouri. Davis’ obituary puts him at Sonoma, the Bear Flag Revolt, on June 14, 1846. There is circumstantial evidence to support this claim, but no direct documentary evidence. In early 1848, Davis was in Washington D. C. to testify at Frémont's court martial for mutiny.

Joseph B. Chiles—who first came to California with the Bartleson-Bidwell party in 1841—was also in attendance at the court martial. Chiles had established a ranch for himself in Napa Valley, but in 1850, Jerome came back out to California to work with Chiles to establish Yolo County’s first dairy and a rope ferry at the I-Street Bridge location in Sacramento. Davis married Joseph’s daughter Mary and settled on part of a grant which Chiles had purchased; land that became the City
The Jerome C. and Mary Chiles Davis Homestead Marker north of Sproul Hall image. Click for full size.
By Adrian Gabriel, July 3, 2012
3. The Jerome C. and Mary Chiles Davis Homestead Marker north of Sproul Hall
of Davis and U.C. Davis.

Jerome C. Davis was a charter member of the California Agricultural Association and served as President. His stock farm twice won the Most Improved award, in 1858 and 1861. However, after 1861, flooding, drought, market conditions, debt and land claim issues significantly disrupted the Davis operations. In 1867, the land was sold to the California Pacific Railroad and the town of Davisville was established the next year. An alternate name under consideration was “Veranda City.”

After the University State Farm was awarded, the editor of the Davisville Enterprise, W. H. Scott, changed the name of his paper to the Davis Enterprise as it was more distinguished. The city officially incorporated in 1917 as Davis. However, the railroad never did refer to the stop as Davisville. It was always just “Davis” in the newspaper. The University Farm became a full-fledged University of California school in 1959.
 
Categories. AgricultureEducationSettlements & Settlers
 
Site of the Jerome C. and Mary Chiles Davis Homestead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Adrian Gabriel, July 3, 2012
4. Site of the Jerome C. and Mary Chiles Davis Homestead Marker
North Hall image. Click for full size.
By Adrian Gabriel, July 5, 2012
5. North Hall
North Hall was the second building built on the University Farm. Construction was completed in 1908 and it originally served as a dormitory. As of 2012, North Hall houses Counseling and Psychological Services and the Women's Resources and Research Center.
South Hall image. Click for full size.
By Adrian Gabriel, July 5, 2012
6. South Hall
South Hall was completed in 1912 as one of the original three dormitories, along with North Hall and West Hall--which no longer stands. South Hall currently houses multiple administrative departments.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Adrian Gabriel of Davis, California. This page has been viewed 438 times since then and 21 times this year. Last updated on , by Adrian Gabriel of Davis, California. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Adrian Gabriel of Davis, California.   5, 6. submitted on , by Adrian Gabriel of Davis, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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