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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Berne in Albany County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Mill Site

 
 
Mill Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 7, 2012
1. Mill Site Marker
Inscription.
For Carding and Fulling
Mill Built at an Early
Date by Malachi Whipple
William H. Ball
And Lyman Dwight

 
Erected 1932 by New York State Education Department.
 
Location. 42° 37.567′ N, 74° 8.03′ W. Marker is in Berne, New York, in Albany County. Marker is on Berne-Altamont Road (New York State Route 156), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2975 Route 156, Berne NY 12023, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Ax Factory (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Reformed Dutch Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Cheese Factory (approx. 0.3 miles away); Schools (approx. half a mile away); Dutch Barn (approx. 1.2 miles away); Knieskem Farm (approx. 2 miles away); Sand Farm (approx. 2.4 miles away); West Berne (approx. 2.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Berne.
 
Regarding Mill Site. Carding is the process of combing fibers to untangle, straighten and lay them parallel before spinning them. Before wool can be spun into yarn for knitting or weaving into cloth, it first must be brushed, or carded.
Mill Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 7, 2012
2. Mill Site Marker
This tedious task was successfully mechanized in the second half of the 18th century by several British inventors, principally Richard Arkwright and James Hargreaves. By the late 1780s carding machines began to be built in the United States, carding as much wool in minutes as a hand-carder could do in as many hours. By 1811 the federal government estimated that on average every town had at least one carding mill where farm families could bring their wool and pay to have it carded. This made the domestic production of cloth much easier by removing this time-consuming step. As textile factories multiplied in the 19th century, however, people stopped making their own cloth at home, and custom carding mills declined. Today, of course, there are no longer thousands of neighborhood carding mills in America catering to people who make their own cloth at home by hand. The same technology, however, is still used in modern cotton and woolen factories.


Fulling is the beating and cleaning of cloth in water. The process shrank the loose fibres of the cloth, making it a denser fabric.
 
Also see . . .
1. Malachi Whipple Homestead. (Submitted on July 14, 2012, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
2. Whipple, Malachi. (Submitted on July 14, 2012, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
Mill Site Marker beside the Foxenkill image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 7, 2012
3. Mill Site Marker beside the Foxenkill
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 340 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on August 4, 2016.
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