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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Columbus in Muscogee County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Alma Woodsey Thomas

 
 
Alma Woodsey Thomas Marker, Side 1 image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, June 19, 2012
1. Alma Woodsey Thomas Marker, Side 1
Inscription.
Side 1:

Alma Thomas, nationally known African-American artist, was the eldest of four daughters born to John Maurice Thomas and Amelia Whitaker Cantey. Highly cultured and socially involved, the Thomas family owned this Victorian home in the Rose Hill district, where Thomas was born and lived until the age of 15. Family tradition states that the manuscript for The Souls of Black Folks, by W.E.B. Dubois was typed on the front porch of the Thomas home by Alma Thomas’ cousin, Inez, who was Dubois’ secretary. In 1907, the Thomas family moved from Columbus to Washington, DC to escape racial tension and to seek better educational opportunities. For young Alma, who had demonstrated early artistic interests, the move meant attending a high school that offered art classes. Thomas later entered Howard University and was that school’s very first fine arts graduate.

(Continued on other side two)

Side 2:

(Continued from other side)

Thomas worked as a teacher for over 30 years. Among her accomplishments were the organization of an Arts League and the development of a program to create art galleries within the schools of Washington, DC. Thomas retired from teaching in 1960 to focus on her own art, exploring color, nature, and abstraction as a member of the Washington
Alma Woodsey Thomas Marker, Side 2 image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, June 19, 2012
2. Alma Woodsey Thomas Marker, Side 2
Colorist School of painting. Her work has been recognized by such prestigious institutions as the Whitney Museum, Corcoran Gallery, and the Smithsonian Institution. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration owns several of Thomas’ paintings from her “Space” series, and her work can be found in major museums across the country, including The Columbus Museum.
 
Erected 2010 by Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Historic Columbus Foundation, Inc. and Terry and Shannon Wilson.
 
Location. 32° 29.05′ N, 84° 59.2′ W. Marker is in Columbus, Georgia, in Muscogee County. Marker is at the intersection of 21st Street and 5th Avenue, on the right when traveling west on 21st Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 411 21st Street, Columbus GA 31904, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. City Mills (approx. 0.4 miles away); Colored Department of the City Hospital / Doctors and Nurses (approx. half a mile away); Columbus' First Jewish Cemetery (approx. half a mile away); Eugene J. Bullard, 1895-1961 / World’s First Black Combat Aviator (approx. half a mile away); Brigadier General Henry Lewis Benning
Alma Woodsey Thomas Marker, Side 1 image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, June 19, 2012
3. Alma Woodsey Thomas Marker, Side 1
(approx. half a mile away); Linwood Cemetery (approx. 0.6 miles away); Confederate Dead (approx. 0.6 miles away); This Gun (approx. 0.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Columbus.
 
Regarding Alma Woodsey Thomas. A Wikipedia biograpy of Alma Woodsey Thomas is here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alma_Thomas
 
Categories. African AmericansArts, Letters, Music
 
Alma Woodsey Thomas Marker, Side 2 image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, June 19, 2012
4. Alma Woodsey Thomas Marker, Side 2
The Thomas House and the Alma Woodsey Thomas Marker, Side 1 image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, June 19, 2012
5. The Thomas House and the Alma Woodsey Thomas Marker, Side 1
The Thomas House and the Alma Woodsey Thomas Marker, Side 2 image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, June 19, 2012
6. The Thomas House and the Alma Woodsey Thomas Marker, Side 2
Alma Woodsey Thomas in her studio, c.1968 image. Click for full size.
Ida Jervis from Wikipedia
7. Alma Woodsey Thomas in her studio, c.1968
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 550 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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