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Limestone in Washington County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Crockett’s Tennessee Westward Movement

 
 
Crockett’s Tennessee Westward Movement Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 4, 2012
1. Crockett’s Tennessee Westward Movement Marker
Inscription.
In his nearly half century of life, David Crockett literally migrated from east to west Tennessee. From his birthplace near Limestone, to his last home in Rutherford (Gibson County), the Crockett story weaves its way across the Volunteer state for five decades until he exited at Memphis in November of 1835, leaving his native home for Texas and martyrdom at the Alamo.

I had now one old horse, and a couple of two year old colts. They were both broke to the haiter, and my father-in-law proposed, that, if I went, he would go with me, and take one horse to help me move. So we all fixed up, and I packed my two colts with as many of my things as they could bear; and away we went across the mountains.”
- Davy Crockett

[ Sidebar : ]
Tennessee Native People
The name of Tennessee is derived from the Cherokee word Tanasi or Tanasqui.


The primary Indian nations that inhabited Tennessee were Chickasaw, Cherokee, Koasati, Quapaw, Shawnee, and Yuchi. In 1775, Judge Richard Henderson of the new Transylvania Company enters into an illegal treaty with the Cherokees at Sycamore Shoals to claim land for white settlement of Kentucky and parts of Tennessee. The treaty was overturned by Virginia. Cherokees later fought the American colonists and lost most of their lands.

Congressman
Crockett’s Tennessee Westward Movement Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 4, 2012
2. Crockett’s Tennessee Westward Movement Marker
David Crockett vehemently opposed President Andrew Jackson’s 1830 Indian Removal Bill which eventually led to the mass exodus of most Indians from their ancestral lands – and becomes known as the “Trail of Tears.”

Cherokee Chief John Ross profusely thanked Crockett in an eloquent eight page letter for his heroic stand against Jackson. David Crockett’s vote on behalf of Native peoples cost him his bid for re-election in 1813.
 
Location. 36° 12.368′ N, 82° 39.554′ W. Marker is in Limestone, Tennessee, in Washington County. Marker is on Musket Lane, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is on the grounds of the Davy Crockett Birthplace State Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1245 Davy Crockett Park Road, Limestone TN 37681, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Real Likeness of David Crockett (here, next to this marker); Welcome to Davy Crockett Birthplace State Park (here, next to this marker); A Summary of the Life of Davy Crockett (here, next to this marker); Crockett (within shouting distance of this marker); Davy Crockett’s Birthplace (within shouting
Marker in Davy Crockett Birthplace State Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 4, 2012
3. Marker in Davy Crockett Birthplace State Park
distance of this marker); Unionist Stronghold (approx. ¼ mile away); Edward Chalmers Huffaker (approx. 1.7 miles away); Ebenezer (approx. 1.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Limestone.
 
More about this marker. The background of the marker contains a map of the state of Tennessee indicating the locations of important events in the life of the Crockett family. These include:
Rogersville/1777 – Grandparents are killed in Indian attack.
1. 1786   Birth of David Crockett on August 17 in present day Limestone, TN
2. 1792   Family moves to Stockton’s fort near headwaters of Lick Creek (Rheatown)
3. 1793   Crocketts move to a home and mill site on Cove Creek
4. 1794   Mill destroyed by a flood, Crockett family moves to Jefferson County
5. 1796   John Crockett opens a tavern in present-day Morristown
6. 1806   David marries Mary (Polly) Finley and they live in Finley Gap.
7. 1811   David, Polly, and two sons move to Mulberry Creek in Lincoln County
8. 1813   Crockett and his family move to Bean’s Creek in Franklin County
Winchester/1813 – Crockett musters
Davy Crockett Birthplace State Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 4, 2012
4. Davy Crockett Birthplace State Park
Marker is located in Davy Crockett Birthplace State Park.
in with Gen. Jackson’s army.
9. 1817   David and second wife Elizabeth move to Lawrence County
Reelfoot Lake/1820s – “Land of the Shakes” becomes Crockett’s favorite hunting ground.
10. 1822   After devastating flood, Crocketts move to present day Rutherford
Memphis/1826 – Crockett survives flatboat disaster, meets Mayor Winchester, who supports him for Congress.
11. 1835   Following a political defeat, Crockett heads to Texas to find a new home

The Sidebar includes a picture of a Cherokee brave.
 
Also see . . .
1. Davy Crockett Birthplace State Park. (Submitted on August 15, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
2. Biography of Davy Crockett. (Submitted on August 15, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 351 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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