Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Toccoa in Stephens County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Stephens County

 
 
Stephens County Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 22, 2012
1. Stephens County Marker
Inscription.
This County, created by Act of the Legislature August 18, 1905, is named for Alexander Hamilton Stephens, Vice President of the Confederacy. A state legislator and Senator he was elected to Congress at 31, serving from 1843 to 1859. Elected to the Senate in 1866 he was refused his seat but again served in Congress from 1873 to 82 when he became Governor. He died March 4, 1883. Among the first County Officers were: Sheriff W. A. Stowe, Clerk of Superior Court W. A. Bailey, Ordinary B. P. Brown Jr., Tax Receiver M. C. Jarrett, Tax Collector C. L. Mize, Treasurer C. L., Dance, Coroner Sidney Williams and Surveyor M. B. Collier.
 
Erected 1954 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 127-1.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 34° 34.77′ N, 83° 19.843′ W. Marker is in Toccoa, Georgia, in Stephens County. Marker is on East Doyle Street 0 miles east of North Alexander Street, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. The marker stands in front of the Stephens County Courthouse. Marker is in this post office area: Toccoa GA 30577, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Stephen County Fallen Veterans Monument
Stephens County Marker<br>Stephens County Courthouse in Background image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 14, 2013
2. Stephens County Marker
Stephens County Courthouse in Background
(within shouting distance of this marker); Stephens County Revolutionary Soldiers Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Stephens County World War I Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Stephens County Confederate Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Capt. A.H. Ramsay, C.V. (within shouting distance of this marker); Reverend Andrew Cauthen Craft and Susan Blake Craft (within shouting distance of this marker); Kelly Barnes Dam Break Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Toccoa Korean War Monument (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Toccoa City Hall (about 300 feet away); Paul Anderson Memorial Park (approx. 0.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Toccoa.
 
Also see . . .  Alexander H. Stephens. Alexander Hamilton Stephens (February 11, 1812 – March 4, 1883) was an American politician from Georgia. (Submitted on February 15, 2013, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
Stephens County Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 22, 2012
3. Stephens County Marker

1. Alexander Hamilton Stephens, (1812 - 1883)
Alexander Hamilton Stephens, (great-great-uncle of Robert Grier Stephens, Jr.), a Representative from Georgia; born near Crawfordville, Taliaferro County, Ga., on February 11, 1812; attended private and public schools; was graduated from the University of Georgia at Athens in 1832; taught school eighteen months; studied law; was admitted to the bar in Crawfordville in 1834; member of the State house of representatives 1836-1841; served in the State senate in 1842; elected as a Whig to the Twenty-eighth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Mark A. Cooper; reelected as a Whig to the Twenty-ninth through Thirty-first Congresses, as a Unionist to the Thirty-second Congress, as a Whig to the Thirty-third Congress and as a Democrat to the Thirty-fourth and Thirty-fifth Congresses and served from October 2, 1843, to March 3, 1859; chairman, Committee on Territories (Thirty-fifth Congress); was not a candidate for renomination in 1858; member of the secession convention of Georgia in 1861, which elected him to the Confederate Congress, and was chosen by that Congress as Vice President of the provisional government; elected Vice President of the Confederacy; one of the commissioners representing the Confederacy at the Hampton Roads conference in February 1865; after the Civil War was
Stephens County Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 22, 2012
4. Stephens County Marker
The Stephens County Courthouse is in the background.
imprisoned in Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, for five months, until October 1865; elected to the United States Senate in 1866 by the first legislature convened under the new State constitution, but did not present his credentials, as the State had not been readmitted to representation; elected as a Democrat to the Forty-third Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Ambrose R. Wright; reelected to the Forty-fourth and to the three succeeding Congresses and served from December 1, 1873, until his resignation November 4, 1882; chairman, Committee on Coinage, Weights, and Measures (Forty-fourth through Forty-sixth Congresses); elected Governor of Georgia in 1882 and served until his death in Atlanta, Ga., March 4, 1883; interment in a vault in Oakland Cemetery; reinterment on his estate, “Liberty Hall,” near Crawfordville, Ga. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted February 15, 2013, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Political Subdivisions
 
Stephens County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 22, 2012
5. Stephens County Courthouse
This is the original courthouse in Stephens County, built in 1905.
Alexander Hamilton Stephens image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
6. Alexander Hamilton Stephens
For whom Stephens County was named
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 311 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement