“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Quincy in Adams County, Illinois — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)

The Mormons in Quincy

The Mormons in Quincy Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Pfingsten, June 11, 2012
1. The Mormons in Quincy Marker
Inscription. Mormons in Missouri were forced to flee their homes or face death because of an "extermination order" issued in 1838 by Governor Lillburn Boggs. Many of them crossed into Illinois at Quincy and were made welcome by the people here. In April 1839 they were joined by their leader Joseph Smith, who had been imprisoned on charges of treason since November 1838. Smith had long envisioned a great Mormon community. In May of 1839 he purchased land upriver from Quincy and set about building his city -- Nauvoo. it became the center of Mormon life and by his death in 1844 was the largest city in Illinois.
Erected 1976 by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints and the Illinois State Historical Society.
Marker series. This marker is included in the Illinois State Historical Society marker series.
Location. 39° 55.92′ N, 91° 24.569′ W. Marker is in Quincy, Illinois, in Adams County. Marker is on Maine Street. Click for map. Marker is at Washington Park. Marker is in this post office area: Quincy IL 62301, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Stephen A. Douglas in Quincy (within shouting distance of this marker); Lincoln's Friend Johnston (within shouting distance of this marker); A Quincy "Copperhead" (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Search for Equality (about 300 feet away); Political Campaigning in 1858 (about 300 feet away); Lincoln-Douglas Debate (about 300 feet away); Lorado Taft (1860 - 1936) (about 300 feet away); Douglas' Disciple (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Quincy.
Categories. Churches, Etc.Settlements & Settlers
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 368 times since then and 79 times this year. Photo   1. submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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