Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fairbanks in Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska — The American West (Northwest)
 

James A. Maple

P. E. Arctic Pipeline Pioneer

 

1937 - 2001

 
Trans-Alaska Pipeline Historical Marker at Milepost 450 image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 28, 2012
1. Trans-Alaska Pipeline Historical Marker at Milepost 450
Inscription. Dr. Maple was a structural engineer and principal designer of the trans-Alaska pipeline. He holds three patents for his development of innovative pipe supports that enabled the warm oil pipeline to safely traverse areas of permafrost. He pioneered the use of sophisticated structural analysis for pipelines, now used on arctic pipelines worldwide. A graduate of Purdue University, he was a major contributor not only during design and construction but also continued to provide engineering expertise for the pipeline until his death in 2001. In recognition of this contribution to the engineering of arctic pipelines, Dr. Maple was awarded the prestigious Harold R. Peyton Award for Cold Regions Engineering by the American Society of Civil Engineers in 2001. The award was named for Dr. Peyton, another key pipeline designer, who unfortunately died just before the pipeline was commissioned in 1977.

Dedicated August 1, 2002 in commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the opening of the trans-Alaska Pipeline.
 
Erected 2002.
 
Location. 64° 55.767′ N, 147° 37.717′ W. Marker is near Fairbanks, Alaska, in Fairbanks North Star Borough. Marker is on Steese Highway (Alaska Route 2), on the right when traveling north.
James A. Maple & Trans-Alaska Pipeline Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 28, 2012
2. James A. Maple & Trans-Alaska Pipeline Marker
Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fairbanks AK 99712, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Pipeline History (within shouting distance of this marker); Wickersham Cabin (approx. 6.4 miles away); Lacey Street Theater (1939) (approx. 6.5 miles away); Barnette's Landing (approx. 6.5 miles away); Clay Street Cemetery (approx. 6.5 miles away); The Founding of Fairbanks (approx. 6.5 miles away); Suter House (approx. 6.6 miles away); Cushman Street (approx. 6.6 miles away).
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceScience & Medicine
 
James A. Maple Award image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 28, 2012
3. James A. Maple Award
American Welding Society image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 28, 2012
4. American Welding Society
Outstanding Development in Welding Fabrication Award is honorably bestowed upon the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company in recognition of the advanced technology and high quality of welding used in the construction of the Tran-Alaska Pipeline system, which, as a significant supplier of our nation's oil, remains one of the technological marvels of the modern world, and a testament to the quality of work undertaken by the welders and engineers who constructed it. November 2002.
Trans Alaska Pipeline image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 28, 2012
5. Trans Alaska Pipeline
Trans Alaska Pipeline image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 28, 2012
6. Trans Alaska Pipeline
Trans Alaska Pipeline image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 28, 2012
7. Trans Alaska Pipeline
Cleaning & Flow Pig image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 28, 2012
8. Cleaning & Flow Pig
Devices call “pigs” improve the flow of oil through the Trans Alaska pipeline and monitor its condition. Pigs are launched and retrieved at pump stations and travel through the pipeline with the moving oil. The orange polyurethane sample in the pipe segment is a cleaning and flow improvement pig. Other more sophisticated pigs use magnetic fields and ultrasonic signals to detect small changes in the wall thickness and shape. Pigs are among the most important tools available for protecting the pipeline and detecting potential problems.
Cleaning & Flow Pig image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 28, 2012
9. Cleaning & Flow Pig
Retired Scraper Pig image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 28, 2012
10. Retired Scraper Pig
This pig scraped wax from the internal walls of the pipe when the pipeline first began operating. Once the system warmed up from the constant flow of hot North Slope oil, wax buildup ended. At that time the scraper pig was replaced by the lighter and softer polyurethane version in the adjacent display. The polyurethane pig smoothes the flow of oil by reducing turbulence, making it easier to pump. The oil is approximately 100 degrees Fahrenheit as it passes this location. The scraper pig weighs 2,600 pounds, almost 1,000 pounds more than its replacement.
Retired Scraper Pig image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 28, 2012
11. Retired Scraper Pig
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 620 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   9. submitted on , by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   10, 11. submitted on , by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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