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Great Barrington in Berkshire County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

First Court House of Berkshire County

 
 
First Court House of Berkshire County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 19, 2012
1. First Court House of Berkshire County Marker
Inscription.
Near this spot stood the first court house of Berkshire County erected 1764.
Here August 16, 1774 occurred the first open resistance to British rule in America
 
Location. 42° 11.627′ N, 73° 21.792′ W. Marker is in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, in Berkshire County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street (U.S. 7) and Castle Street, on the left when traveling north on Main Street. Click for map. Located in front of Great Barrington Town Hall. Marker is at or near this postal address: 334 Main Street, Great Barrington MA 01230, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Great Barrington Civil War Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); You Stand Free Because They Served (within shouting distance of this marker); Great Barrington World War I Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); The Mahaiwe Theater (within shouting distance of this marker); IEEE Milestone (approx. 0.3 miles away); Memorial Street Light (approx. 0.3 miles away); William Stanley (approx. 0.4 miles away); Gen. Henry Knox Trail (approx. 0.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Great Barrington.
 
Regarding First Court House of Berkshire County. On August 16, 1774, the townspeople
First Court House of Berkshire County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 19, 2012
2. First Court House of Berkshire County Marker
of Great Barrington assembled at the courthouse on court day. They locked the doors and refused admittance to Judge Ingersoll, a crown judge. Tradition says they dragged his cocked hat and powdered wig through the mud; placed him backwards on an old horse and rode him out of town amid jeers.
The next day the judge and his sympathizers attempted to regain entrance to the courthouse. He was arrested and jailed in Litchfield County, Connecticut. Leaving jail he returned to his home in Hartford, and then to England. No more courts answerable to the king were held in Great Barrington. Soon many courthouses in New England closed their doors to English demands, leading to the beginning of the Revolutionary War in April, 1775.
 
Categories. Colonial EraPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 436 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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