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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Clara Barton

 
 
Clara Barton Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. Clara Barton Monument
Inscription.
(Upper Plaque):
During the Battle of Antietam
September 17, 1862
Clara Barton brought supplies
and nursing aid to the wounded
on this battlefield.
The act of love and mercy
led to the birth of the present
American
National Red Cross


(Lower Plaque):
This symbolic red cross has been made from a brick from the chimney of the home where Clara Barton was born at North Oxford, Massachusetts on Christmas Day, 1821.
 
Location. 39° 29.332′ N, 77° 44.843′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Mansfield Avenue, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Located at the pull off for stop two on the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield, the Poffenberger Farm. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Clara Barton (here, next to this marker); 7th Regiment Pennsylvania (a few steps from this marker); The Culmination of Another Great Tragedy was at Hand (within shouting distance of this marker); 4th Regiment Pennsylvania Reserve Volunteer Corps
Close Up of the Inscription image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
2. Close Up of the Inscription
(within shouting distance of this marker); 1st Corps, 3rd Division, 2nd Brigade Bivouac (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Army Corps (about 400 feet away); 3rd Regt. Pennsylvania (about 400 feet away); Meade's Division, First Army Corps (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Meade's Division, First Army Corps (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named First Army Corps (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Clara Barton Monument. National Park Service page detailing the monument. (Submitted on March 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Biographical Article on Clara Barton. National Park Service page. (Submitted on March 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Clarissa Harlowe Barton. Barton's efforts on behalf of the soldiers did not stop with the end of the war. She continued to assist families locating missing soldiers. Later she worked to expand the role of the Red Cross to include response to natural disasters and other emergencies. (Submitted on March 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
The Red Cross and Lower Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 29, 2008
3. The Red Cross and Lower Plaque
 

4. Clara Barton House. Clara Barton's House in Glen Echo is also on the marker list. Additional links. (Submitted on March 4, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkWar, US Civil
 
Clara Barton Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Clara Barton Monument
7th Pennsylvania Reserves and Clara Barton Monuments at Stop Two image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
5. 7th Pennsylvania Reserves and Clara Barton Monuments at Stop Two
Clara Barton Marker (Center) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
6. Clara Barton Marker (Center)
Clara Barton image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
7. Clara Barton
This c. 1865 photo of Clara Barton by Mathew B. Brady hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Clara Barton considered herself foremost a relief worker, whose efforts to aid those in need consumed most of her adult life. Yet she is remembered best as a Civil War nurse and as the founder of the American Red Cross. During the war; Barton realized her true calling of service by organizing and distributing supplies to Union soldiers and visiting the fields of battle as an independent nurse. At war's end; she organized a missing soldiers office, answering thousands of inquiries from bereaved families about their loved ones. When she closed the office in 1867, she had identified the fate of some 22,000 men. Later, after attending a European meeting of the International Red Cross, Barton returned home and worked to found the American Red Cross in 1881. She served as its first president for the next twenty-three years.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,269 times since then and 58 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   6. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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