Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lexington in Fayette County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Henry Clay's Law Office

 
 
Henry Clay's Law Office Marker image. Click for full size.
By Ken Smith, September 1, 2012
1. Henry Clay's Law Office Marker
Inscription. Erected 1803-04, this is the only office standing used by Clay; he occupied it from 1804 until ca. 1810. During these significant years in his career, Clay was elected to successive terms in legislature and to unexpired terms in the United States Senate. Builders Stephens and Winslow used their characteristic brick basement. Original floorboards remain.
 
Erected 1978 by Kentucky Historical Society, Kentucky Department of Highways. (Marker Number 139.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Kentucky Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 38° 2.974′ N, 84° 29.805′ W. Marker is in Lexington, Kentucky, in Fayette County. Marker is on North Mill Street 0.1 miles south of West 2nd Street, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 176 N Mill St, Lexington KY 40507, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Presbyterian Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Lexington Public Library 1905 - 1989 / A Carnegie Library (within shouting distance of this marker); Morgan House (within shouting distance of this marker); Samuel Brown, M.D. (1769 - 1830)
Henry Clay's Law Office Marker image. Click for full size.
By Ken Smith, September 1, 2012
2. Henry Clay's Law Office Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Hunt-Morgan House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Thomas Hunt Morgan / Genetic Research (about 500 feet away); School Of Medicine (about 500 feet away); Silversmith Shop (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Lexington.
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
Henry Clay image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
3. Henry Clay
This 1842 portrait of Henry Clay by John Neagle hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.

“His admirers called him Gallant Harry, and his impetuous charm made him quite possibly the most beloved politician of his generation. But the real legacy of Kentucky's Henry Clay was his unstinting devotion, in the House of Representatives and later in the Senate, to maintaining a strong American union. In the early 1830s, as southern states threatened to nullify federal authority over a tariff bill that would have hurt plantation economies, Clay set aside his own preference for the new law to orchestrate a compromise. In 1850, with the North and South on the verge of armed conflict over the extension of slavery into the new western territories, Clay again stepped in with proposals that, temporarily at least, satisfied both sections. This last act of his career earned him the title of Great Pacificator.”
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Ken Smith of Milan, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 343 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Ken Smith of Milan, Tennessee.   3. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement