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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

First Army Corps

 
 
First Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. First Army Corps Marker
Inscription.
U.S.A.
First Army Corps.

Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker, Commanding.
September 16, 1862.

The First Army Corps moved from its bivouac near Keedysville at 2 p.m. on Sept 16. Doubleday's Division crossed the Antietam at Pry's Ford; Rickett's and Meade's Divisions at the upper bridge.

The divisions advanced in parallel columns, in a westerly direction, until 6 p.m., when Meade's Division encountered the enemy near the East Woods.

The corps was then formed in line of battle, facing south and south-west, Meade's Division in the center, somewhat advanced. Doubleday's Division on the right and Ricketts' Division on the left in supporting distance.

The fighting ceased on account of darkness at about 6:30 p.m.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 1.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 29.328′ N, 77° 44.75′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Mansfield Avenue, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Located just east of the pull off for stop two on the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield, the Poffenberger
First Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. First Army Corps Marker
Farm. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Meade's Division, First Army Corps (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Meade's Division, First Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); 3rd Regt. Pennsylvania (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named First Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); 1st Corps, 3rd Division, 2nd Brigade Bivouac (within shouting distance of this marker); 8th Regt. Pennsylvania Reserver Volunteer Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); 4th Regiment Pennsylvania Reserve Volunteer Corps (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Culmination of Another Great Tragedy was at Hand (about 300 feet away); Clara Barton (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Clara Barton (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on March 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. First Army Corps. The First Corps was commanded by Major General Joseph Hooker at the battle. When he was wounded, Brig. Gen. George Meade replaced
War Tablets Flanking the 3rd Pennsylvania Reserves Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
3. War Tablets Flanking the 3rd Pennsylvania Reserves Monument
War Department Tablet Number 1 is closest to the to the camera.
him temporarily. (Submitted on March 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Joseph Hooker. Joseph Hooker (November 13, 1814 – October 31, 1879) was a career United States Army officer, achieving the rank of major general in the Union Army during the American Civil War. (Submitted on October 25, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
First Army Corps Marker<br>First From the Left image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. First Army Corps Marker
First From the Left
Major General Joseph Hooker (1814-1879) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
5. Major General Joseph Hooker (1814-1879)
At Antietam, his corps launched the first assault of the bloodiest day in American history, driving south into the corps of Lt. Gen. Stonewall Jackson, where they fought each other to a standstill. Hooker, aggressive and inspiring to his men, left the battle early in the morning with a foot wound. He asserted that the battle would have been a decisive Union victory if he had managed to stay on the field, but General McClellan's caution once again failed the Northern troops and Lee's much smaller army eluded destruction.
The Upper Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
6. The Upper Bridge
Two of Hooker's divisions used the Hitt Bridge to cross Antietam Creek. The Bridge stands today about two and a half driving miles to the east where the Mansfield Monument Road intersects the Keedysville Road.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,092 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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