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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
York in York County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Soldiers and Sailors of the Late War of the Rebellion

 
 
Inscription on Soldiers and Sailors Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 1, 2008
1. Inscription on Soldiers and Sailors Monument
Inscription. In memory of the York County soldiers and sailors of the late War of the Rebellion, 1861–1865.
 
Erected 1898.
 
Location. 39° 57.428′ N, 76° 43.637′ W. Marker is in York, Pennsylvania, in York County. Marker is on West College Avenue near South Beaver Street, on the right. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: York PA 17401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Penn Common (within shouting distance of this marker); James Smallwood Schoolhouse (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); York County Prison (approx. 0.3 miles away); Major John Clark (approx. 0.3 miles away); Globe Inn (approx. 0.3 miles away); York and York County World War II Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away); Colonel Thomas Hartley (approx. 0.3 miles away); Cherry Lane (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in York.
 
More about this marker. It is in Penn Commons Park, at the site of the Civil War Army hospital, facing north up Beaver Street. Its total height is approx. 50 feet. A 10 foot high marble female figure stands atop a 35 foot column. Four 7½ foot high bronze military figures surround the column facing
Soldiers and Sailors Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 1, 2008
2. Soldiers and Sailors Monument
outward at the corners of the five foot base: An officer, sword at this side; a soldier holding a rifle; a cannonier holding a tamping rod; a sailor with his briquet (sabre). On each sides of the monument are four friezes depicting an infantry engagement, a cavalry charge, a battle aboard ship, and artillery in battle. Monument is unsigned, bearing the foundry mark of Bureau Brothers and the name of the contractor, Edward Gallagher, Jr. This monument was built on the site of the Civil War military hospital (see nearby Penn Common marker for more information).
 
Also see . . .  Pennsylvania in the American Civil War. “The city of York, Pennsylvania, [site of a large military hospital,] became the largest Northern city to be occupied by Confederate troops when Jubal A. Early’s division took control of the town in late June 1863 and extracted a ransom.” (Submitted on March 2, 2008.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Victory Atop Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 1, 2008
3. Victory Atop Monument
Military Figures and Friezes at Base image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 1, 2008
4. Military Figures and Friezes at Base
Officer image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 1, 2008
5. Officer
Soldier image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 1, 2008
6. Soldier
Cannoneer image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 1, 2008
7. Cannoneer
Sailor image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 1, 2008
8. Sailor
Infantry Engagement image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 1, 2008
9. Infantry Engagement
Cavalry Attack image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 1, 2008
10. Cavalry Attack
Battle on a Ship’s Deck image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 1, 2008
11. Battle on a Ship’s Deck
Artillery in Battle image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 1, 2008
12. Artillery in Battle
Birdseye View of Penn Common, York, PA image. Click for full size.
circa 1916
13. Birdseye View of Penn Common, York, PA
Postcard No. 25912 published by Fair & Square Bargain House, York, Pa., reads “Penn Park. Long known as ‘The Commons.’ Given by Penn’s heirs, 1741. First embraced 20, then 16 acres. Early used as public pasture ground. Then by circuses, Militia musters and ‘Squire’ Baxton. Used by ‘Mad’ Anthony Wayne and his soldiers in Revolution; 7,000 soldiers encamped upon it in 1814 for assistance and defense of Baltimore. First York County Agricultural Fair held upon it in 1853. From 1861–5 used by soldiers and by government hospitals; 14,000 sick and wounded soldiers treated, of whom several hundred died and were buried on a plot in Prospect Hill Cemetery. Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument 60 ft. high erected on it in 1898. Many other improvements made. A large public library may be placed on its site in near future. —Dr. I. H. Betz.”
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,280 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   13. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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