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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Newburg in Charles County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“Cliffton”

 
 
"Cliffton" Marker image. Click for full size.
Maryland Historical Trust (Historic Sites Survey)
1. "Cliffton" Marker
Inscription. On this location Maj. R. G. Watson and his daughter Mary, both Confederate agents, lived and carried on a direct mail and slave route between the North and the South during the entire Civil War. Because of the unobstructed view from these cliffs, this was an ideal location. Maj. Watson would meet the boat while Mary would watch from an upstairs window and signal if it was unsafe by placing a black flag in the window.

Within a short distance from this point John Wilkes Booth, Abraham Lincoln's assassin crossed the Potomac in his historic flight.
 
Location. 38° 22.333′ N, 76° 58.97′ W. Marker is in Newburg, Maryland, in Charles County. Marker is on Overlook Circle. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Newburg MD 20664, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Potomac Diversion (approx. 1.2 miles away); John Wilkes Booth (approx. 1.2 miles away); a different marker also named Cliffton (approx. 1.3 miles away); Wolleston Manor (approx. 1.4 miles away); 300 Year Old Southern Red Oak (approx. 1.6 miles away); Crossing the Potomac
Mary Augusta Watson (Carvell) daughter of Major RG Watson image. Click for full size.
2. Mary Augusta Watson (Carvell) daughter of Major RG Watson
(approx. 1.8 miles away); Civil War Action At Mathias Point (approx. 2.1 miles away in Virginia); Keechland (approx. 2.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Newburg.
 
More about this marker. The marker (and Cliffton) no longer exist.
 
Regarding “Cliffton”. According to the report in the Maryland Historical Trust Historic Sites Survey, "Clifton No. 2 was first identified in the early 1970's by J. Richard Rivoire just prior to the site's subdivision, now Clifton on the Potomac. At the time it was believed that this was the home of Josiah Fendall and plans were underway to convert the structure into a museum. Later research revealed that the existing 18th c. structure was likely built as a dependency for a much larger dwelling. After learning this, the building and its plans were abandoned leading to its eventual collapse in the mid-1980's."
 
Additional keywords. John Wilkes Booth Escape Route
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsWar, US Civil
 
Outbuilding, Cliffton image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey
3. Outbuilding, Cliffton
This 18th century structure was thought to have been Cliffton. Further research revealed that it was but one of many outbuildings on the property.
Outbuilding, Cliffton image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey
4. Outbuilding, Cliffton
Outbuilding, Cliffton (interior) image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey
5. Outbuilding, Cliffton (interior)
Outbuilding, Cliffton image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey
6. Outbuilding, Cliffton
Outbuilding, Cliffton image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey
7. Outbuilding, Cliffton
Outbuilding, Cliffton (interior) image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey
8. Outbuilding, Cliffton (interior)
Outbuilding, Cliffton (interior) image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey
9. Outbuilding, Cliffton (interior)
Outbuilding, Cliffton (interior) image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey
10. Outbuilding, Cliffton (interior)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. This page has been viewed 1,800 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.   2. submitted on , by David Watson of Washington DC, United States.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on , by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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