“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Galveston in Galveston County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)

Galveston Artillery Club

Galveston Artillery Club Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, September 9, 2012
1. Galveston Artillery Club Marker
Inscription. By 1840, a year after its incorporation, the city of Galveston was home to approximately 1,200 residents, the entry point for scores of immigrants and a major coastal shipping port. Ongoing tensions between the young Republic of Texas and Mexico had led to the creation of several volunteer militia groups. On September 13 of that year, a group primarily composed of local businessmen and their clerks organized the Galveston Artillery Company. The group received its charter in January 1841 to protect the harbor and the city. Members elected John Howe as captain, and he appointed A.C. Crawford, L.E. Nordman, W. Denny, C. Frankland and E.O. Lynch, as well as four sergeants and four corporals, as the company's first officers.

The company participated locally in parades, drills, musters and Battle of San Jacinto commemorations, and the group became known for its lavish annual balls. The Texas government rarely called the company into state service; members made their most eventful journey off the island in 1861, at the outset of the Civil War, accompanying other groups to call for Federal surrender of Fort Brown (Brownsville). The Galveston company disbanded during the war, with many members participating elsewhere in the conflict.

Following the war, the Galveston Artillery Company underwent several reorganizations, merging
Galveston Artillery Clubhouse image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, September 9, 2012
2. Galveston Artillery Clubhouse
with other local militia groups and later allowing memberships in a separate social branch. By 1899, the group was known as Galveston Artillery Club and had evolved into a social rather than a military organization. During the 20th century, the prestigious club continued to evolve, continuing its traditional balls and other events, while maintaining a proud, strong link to its roots in service to the city of Galveston.
Erected 2004 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13269.)
Location. 29° 17.515′ N, 94° 47.993′ W. Marker is in Galveston, Texas, in Galveston County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of 31st Street and Avenue N 1/2, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3102 Avenue O, Galveston TX 77550, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Site of the Home of Michel Branamour Menard (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); "The Cradle" (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hutchings House (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Hutchings House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Powhatan House (approx. mile away); Galveston Garten Verein (approx. 0.3 miles away); Hagemann-Cobb House (approx. 0.3 miles away); Samuel May Williams (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Galveston.
Categories. Fraternal or Sororal OrganizationsWar, US Civil
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. This page has been viewed 661 times since then and 113 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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