Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Houston in Harris County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

League of United Latin American Citizens, Council 60

 
 
League of United Latin American Citizens, Council 60 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, September 16, 2012
1. League of United Latin American Citizens, Council 60 Marker
Inscription. On February 17, 1929, representatives from three organizations met in Corpus Christi to merge and form the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC). The new group sought to unify statewide efforts to challenge racism and inequities toward Texas' Hispanic residents, while also promoting patriotism, education and equality.

Although needing only ten members to charter a new council, more than 20 Houston men met in 1934 at a filling station and bookstore at 74th and Navigation to form LULAC Council 60, of Magnolia Park. The group immediately set out to eradicate local prejudice and discrimination, and adopted the national organization's primary goals: improving education, employment and civil rights. Many of their early efforts were combined with the Latin American Club of Harris County, with which they merged in 1939 to become simply LULAC Council 60 of Houston. Local work included securing jobs for Mexican Americans in wartime industries; similar efforts later opened the door to Mexican Americans in the city's police and fire departments.

The initially all-male Council 60 organized the LULAC Women Council 22 in 1948 and the Junior LULAC Council in 1949. Throughout the 1940s and 1950s, LULAC, at the state level, was involved with the American G.I. Forum in bringing cases before Texas courts, with one, Pete
League of United Latin American Citizens, Council 60 Meeting Hall image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, September 16, 2012
2. League of United Latin American Citizens, Council 60 Meeting Hall
Hernandez v. State of Texas
, going before the U.S. Supreme Court. The cases resulted in anti-discriminatory decisions, including school desegregation and jury selection. In 1955, LULAC 60 moved to a two-story stucco clubhouse at 3004 Bagby. From these headquarters, Council 60 began several important programs, including the "Little School of the 400," considered to be a model for Project Head Start, and SER, which became Operation SER/Jobs For Progress. The group continues to provide leadership for the national organization.
 
Erected 2004 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13296.)
 
Location. 29° 44.752′ N, 95° 22.886′ W. Marker is in Houston, Texas, in Harris County. Marker is at the intersection of Bagby Street and An Alley, on the right when traveling south on Bagby Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Houston TX 77002, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Courtlandt Place (approx. 0.2 miles away); James L. Autry House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Houston Fire Station No. 7 (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Waldo Mansion (approx. 0.4 miles away); Trinity Episcopal Church (approx. half a mile away); Twentieth Century Development of Freedman's Town (approx. 0.6 miles away); Temple Beth Israel (approx. 0.7 miles away); Benjamin Apartments (approx. 0.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Houston.
 
Also see . . .
1. LULAC Website. (Submitted on September 18, 2012, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
2. LULAC in Wikipedia. (Submitted on September 18, 2012, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
3. Texas LULAC Website. (Submitted on September 18, 2012, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
4. LULAC in the Handbook of Texas. (Submitted on September 18, 2012, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
 
Categories. Civil RightsHispanic Americans
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. This page has been viewed 360 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement