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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fairbanks in Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska — The American West (Northwest)
 

Alaska's Gold Rush Era

 
 
Alaska's Gold Rush Era Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 29, 2012
1. Alaska's Gold Rush Era Marker
Inscription. Gold discoveries brought Alaska and the Yukon to the attention of the world. A series of stampedes occurred over more than three decades. Drawn by dreams of gold, men and women from many places and all walks of life participated in an adventure that would change their lives. Only a few would become wealthy.

Early Discoveries
Prospectors made the first significant gold discovery in Alaska at Juneau in 1880. This discovery encouraged others to look throughout Alaska and the Yukon for gold. The first strike in Alaska’s interior was along the Fortymile River in 1886. It was followed by discoveries on other Yukon River tributaries and the Kenai Peninsula. On August 16, 1886, George Carmack, Skookum Jim and Tagish Charlie made the Klondike discovery in Canada’s Yukon Territory.

At Different Times and Places
The Klondike discovery started a stampede to Dawson reminiscent of the California Gold Rush of 1849. Tens of thousands of people took ships north, then hiked the Chilkoot, White Pass, Valdez Glacier and other trails. Others traveled by boat up the Yukon River to the new gold field. By the time most reached the Klondike, the creeks had all been staked. Some of the stampeders prospected creeks in Alaska and made new strikes. The Nome, Fairbanks and Iditarod gold
Alaska's Gold Rush Era Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 29, 2012
2. Alaska's Gold Rush Era Marker
fields were the largest, but between 1896 and 1914 gold was found in hundreds of places around Alaska.

More than Mining
The Alaska Gold Rush is a collection of the stories of people who were here and those who came. The U.S. Government expanded its activities, developing water and overland transportation routes and a communication system. Communities appeared seemingly overnight. Mining changed Alaska’s landscape. Tales of the people, places and events are unforgettably captured in adventure stories and poems.
 
Erected by The Gold Rush Centennial.
 
Location. 64° 20.405′ N, 146° 51.908′ W. Marker is in Fairbanks, Alaska, in Fairbanks North Star Borough. Marker is on Richardson Highway (Alaska Route 2), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at a roadside pull-off overlooking the Tanana River, about 50 miles south of Fairbanks. Marker is in this post office area: Fairbanks AK 99701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within walking distance of this marker. Tanana Valley Gold (here, next to this marker).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Welcome to Alaska's Gold
Tanana River, view northeast (toward Fairbanks), near marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 29, 2012
3. Tanana River, view northeast (toward Fairbanks), near marker
. The discovery of gold brought adventurers, dreamers and schemers to Alaska. It's a great story! In fact, it's a lot of great stories. (Submitted on September 27, 2012, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. The Gold Rush and Alaska. The role of gold in Alaska's past and present is hard to overlook. There are evidences of it everywhere, in everything from events like Fairbanks Golden Days and Valdez Gold Rush Days, to hotels with names like Golden Nugget, Motherlode, Golden North, and Gold Miner's, to the gold exhibit in the University of Alaska Museum in Fairbanks and to gold nugget jewelry and painted goldpans in gift shops throughout the state. (Submitted on September 27, 2012, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Klondike Gold Rush. The Klondike Gold Rush, also called the Yukon Gold Rush, the Alaska Gold Rush and the Last Great Gold Rush, was an attempt by an estimated 100,000 people to travel to the Klondike region of the Yukon in northwestern Canada between 1897 and 1899 in the hope of successfully prospecting for gold. (Submitted on September 27, 2012, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationIndustry & CommerceNatural ResourcesSettlements & Settlers
 
Tanana River overlook, southwest view image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 29, 2012
4. Tanana River overlook, southwest view
Tanana River overlook, northeast view image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 29, 2012
5. Tanana River overlook, northeast view
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 505 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on August 3, 2016.
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