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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Manhattan Borough in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Peking

1911

 
 
<i>Peking</i> Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 15, 2012
1. Peking Marker
Inscription.
Peking was launched in 1911 at Hamburg, Germany by the Blohm & Voss shipyard. She was owned by the F. Laeisz Company of that port, who used here to carry fuel and manufactured goods to the West Coast of South America, around Cape Horn, and return to European ports with nitrate mined in northern Chile. The nitrate was used to fertilize the worn-out fields of Europe and to manufacture chemicals for various applications, including munitions.

With her four-masted bark rig, steel hull and masts, and midship bridge deck, Peking represents the final generation of sailing ships built for world trade. Thought a product of the 20th century, she still sailed in the traditional way, with few labor-saving devices or safety features. Her crew followed the standard sailing vessel routine of four hours on duty and four hours off duty, alternating around the clock, seven days a week.

The number of sails set depended on the strength of the wind. When it increased , the sails had to be taken in quickly, no matter what the weather conditions. A ton or more of heavy canvas had to be gathered up by hauling on lines from the deck. For the final furling, the men had to climb “ratlines” almost as high as a seventeen-story building, go out on swaying footropes rigged from the yards, and bundle up the sail with
<i>Peking</i> image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 15, 2012
2. Peking
their bare hands.

Peking was retired in 1933, when steamers using the Panama Canal took over what was left of the nitrate trade. She served as a nautical school for boys, moored in a British river, until she was acquired by the museum in 1974.

Extreme length: 377.5’ Draft: 16’ (current) Net tonnage: 2,883 Length on deck: 320’ Rig: Four-masted bark Displacement tonnage: 8,400 (fully loaded) Construction: Steel hull Rig height: 170.5’ Gross tonnage: 3,100
 
Erected by South Street Seaport Museum.
 
Location. 40° 42.317′ N, 74° 0.183′ W. Marker is in Manhattan Borough, New York, in New York County. Marker can be reached from South Street west of Fulton Street. Click for map. marker is at the northeast corner of the Peking's dock on the grounds of the South Street Seaport Museum - south and east of the F.D.R.- East River Drive and southwest of the Brooklyn Bridge. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10038, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Wavertree (within shouting distance of this marker); Fulton Fish Waist - 142 Beekman Street (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); 207 - 211 Water Street
<i>Peking</i> moored at the South Street Seaport image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 15, 2012
3. Peking moored at the South Street Seaport
- viewed from the east with Lower Manhattan's skyscrapers in the background
(about 600 feet away); South Street Seaport (about 800 feet away); Titanic Memorial Lighthouse (approx. 0.2 miles away); George Clinton (approx. 0.2 miles away); First Underground Central Station (approx. 0.2 miles away); New York’s Municipal Slave Market (approx. 0.2 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia entry for the Peking (ship). (Submitted on October 3, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. windjammer; Flying P-Liner
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
<i>Kruzenshtern</i>, ex-<i>Padua</i>, moored at Warnemunde, Germany image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 26, 2012
4. Kruzenshtern, ex-Padua, moored at Warnemunde, Germany
former "P-Liner", Peking's sister ship, now an active Russian training vessel.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 301 times since then and 19 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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