“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Kingsland in Camden County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)

Treaty of Coleraine

Treaty of Coleraine Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, January 20, 2009
1. Treaty of Coleraine Marker
Inscription. On June 29, 1796, this Treaty was signed ¼ mile south of here near Indian Agent James Seagrove’s home, a trading post and garrison of Federal troops on the St. Marys River. The meeting included representatives of the United States and the State of Georgia, and an assemblage of 400 Creek Indians. Though unpopular in Georgia, the treaty affirmed the authority of the Federal government over state governments in Native American relations, and helped further President Washington’s plan to domesticate the Creeks. The Treaty of Coleraine also helped establish Benjamin Hawkins as a valuable agent of the Federal government and led to his appointment as Agent for Indian Affairs South of the Ohio River, a position he held until his death in 1816.
Erected 2007 by Georgia Historical Society and the Guale Historical Society. (Marker Number 20-1.)
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
Location. 30° 50.339′ N, 81° 53.902′ W. Marker is near Kingsland, Georgia, in Camden County. Marker is on Okefenokee Parkway (Georgia Route 40) one mile west of Ga. Hwy 110, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Kingsland GA 31548, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Kings Ferry (approx. 5 miles away in Florida); Henry Roddenberry (approx. 6.4 miles away); Charlton County (approx. 6.4 miles away); Center Village or Centerville (approx. 6.4 miles away); Okefenokee Swamp (approx. 6.7 miles away); Sardis Church (approx. 8.2 miles away); Trader's Hill (Fort Alert) (approx. 8.7 miles away); First Masonic Lodge in Charlton County (approx. 8.7 miles away).
Regarding Treaty of Coleraine. The site of the treaty is on private property. The owners request that the public respect their privacy.
Categories. Antebellum South, USNative Americans
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,431 times since then and 123 times this year. Last updated on , by George Varn Jr. of Jacksonville, Florida. Photo   1. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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