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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Alexandria, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Tale of Three Jurisdictions

 
 
A Tale of Three Jurisdictions Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 7, 2012
1. A Tale of Three Jurisdictions Marker
Inscription. Did you know that you traverse the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia when you cross this bridge? The brass lines in the walkway mark the boundaries. They also commemorate the cooperation required to build this bridge.

Follow the numbers to find out how this intersection came to be...

1. Virginia was the first colony.
The first British land grant in the new world was extended by the King to the Virginia Company of London, a collection of court favorites that had financed ocean exploration. Captain John Smith's map of 1612 laid claim to vast territory that stretched from Florida to Canada, and west to the Pacific Ocean.

2. Maryland was established by a land grant to Lord Baltimore.
After a single winter in Newfoundland, George Calvert, First Lord of Baltimore, wrote the British King requesting land in a warmer climate. In 1632, Lord Baltimore and his heirs were granted territory in Virginia to found "the province of Mariland in memory and honor of the Queene."

3. Virginia and Maryland ceded land for the District of Columbia.
In 1790, George Washington selected a site along the Potomac River for the capital of the emerging nation. A ten-mile square was laid out, straddling the river, with this cornerstone marking the southern tip. The cornerstone
A Tale of Three Jurisdictions Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 7, 2012
2. A Tale of Three Jurisdictions Marker
is still standing at the Alexandria end of the bridge, near the lighthouse in Jones Point.

4. Congress returns land to Virginia.
George Washington perhaps silencing criticism of his role in locating the seat of government so close to his vast landholdings, insisted that no federal building be sited on the Virginia side of the District. The city of Alexandria, therefore, never benefited from the growth of the federal city. In 1846, Congress agreed to return all Virginia lands to Virginia, eliciting "great rejoicing and cannon fire."
 
Location. 38° 47.582′ N, 77° 2.339′ W. Marker is in Alexandria, Virginia. Marker can be reached from Capital Beltway (Interstate 95/495) 0.8 miles east of Richmond Highway (U.S. 1), on the left when traveling north. Click for map. On the Woodrow Wilson Memorial bridge, in a wayside on the bridge walkway near the 1.1 mile mark. Marker is in this post office area: Alexandria VA 22314, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Race to Build Ships on Jones Point (within shouting distance of this marker); Mountains of Materials and Massive Manpower (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Fitting-Out Dock (about 600 feet away); World War I-Era Rudder
A Tale of Three Jurisdictions Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 7, 2012
3. A Tale of Three Jurisdictions Marker
(about 700 feet away); Mistress Margaret Brent (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Remarkable Margaret Brent (approx. 0.2 miles away); Who Owns the River? (approx. 0.2 miles away); Prehistory to Colonial Settlement (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Alexandria.
 
Categories. PoliticsSettlements & Settlers
 
A Tale of Three Jurisdictions Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 7, 2012
4. A Tale of Three Jurisdictions Marker
A Tale of Three Jurisdictions Marker on the Woodrow Wilson Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 7, 2012
5. A Tale of Three Jurisdictions Marker on the Woodrow Wilson Bridge
Brass Strip marking the boundary betweeen Virginia and D.C. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 7, 2012
6. Brass Strip marking the boundary betweeen Virginia and D.C.
On The Woodrow Wilson Bridge walkway a few steps west of the "Three Jurisdictions" marker.
Brass Strip marking the D.C. Maryland boundary image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 7, 2012
7. Brass Strip marking the D.C. Maryland boundary
On the Woodrow Wilson Bridge about .1 miles west of the "Three Jurisdictions" marker.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 682 times since then and 4 times this year. Last updated on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   6, 7. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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