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Pittsburgh in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Korean War Veterans’ Monument

 
 
Korean War Veterans' Monument image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, October 9, 2012
1. Korean War Veterans' Monument
Inscription. About the Memorial
American servicemen and women braved violent combat in Korea. The Nation suffered great losses in the War and spiritual anguish in its aftermath. Friends parted, lives were uprooted, futures were transformed; many died or were injured. We now join together to understand, to honor, to heal and to look ahead.

In Korea, each serving brought their own experience; their uniqueness, their dreams into peril. Families confronted the loss of loved ones and of future. With each soldier the nation risked a part of itself. Many thousands, each with their own signature on life, united for freedom.

This Memorial intends to symbolize and express the life spirit of those who served, directly and indirectly, in the Korean War. It is a reflection, in part, of just one who served. It is meant to signal remembrance of the breadth and pulse of their identity. And, it is a marker for the array of human qualities nurtured by the freedom we protect.

This Memorial is positioned and shaped to capture sunlight. As the sun travels the horizon, columns of light articulate, sequentially, aspects of human spirit, experience and feeling. Through solid and void, light and shadow, the sun traces a spectrum of individual and shared experience.

It is hoped this Memorial will become a welcome place; that
Korean War Veterans' Monument image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, October 9, 2012
2. Korean War Veterans' Monument
it can evoke memory, emotion and vision through the eyes of each visitor. It is meant to be very personal.

R. Allen Christianson
Memorial Architect
 
Erected 1999.
 
Location. 40° 26.74′ N, 80° 0.484′ W. Marker is in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in Allegheny County. Click for map. Located on Riverwalk on the Allegheny River on Pittsburgh's North Shore. Marker is in this post office area: Pittsburgh PA 15212, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First World Series (within shouting distance of this marker); Vietnam Veterans Monument (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); Southwestern Pennsylvania World War II Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); Radio Station KDKA (approx. mile away); The Immaculate Reception (approx. mile away); David L. Lawrence (approx. 0.3 miles away); Roberto Clemente Bridge (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Forks of the Ohio (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Pittsburgh.
 
Categories. War, Korean
 
Korean War Veterans' Monument image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, October 9, 2012
3. Korean War Veterans' Monument
About the Memorial plaque
Chronology of the Korean War image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, October 9, 2012
4. Chronology of the Korean War
Plaque 1
June 25, 1950 through September 29, 1950
Chronology of the Korean War image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, October 9, 2012
5. Chronology of the Korean War
Plaque 2
September 30, 1950 through March 7, 1951
Chronology of the Korean War image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, October 9, 2012
6. Chronology of the Korean War
Plaque 3
March 7, 1951 through July 17, 1952
Chronology of the Korean War image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, October 9, 2012
7. Chronology of the Korean War
Plaque 4
August 12, 1952 through September 6, 1953
Korean War Veterans' Monument Flags image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, October 9, 2012
8. Korean War Veterans' Monument Flags
Brief History of the Korean War image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, October 9, 2012
9. Brief History of the Korean War
The Korean War erupted on June 25, 1950 when the North Korean Army organized, equipped and trained by the Soviet Union invaded the Republic of South Korea.
Encouraged by the prompt action of the United States, the United Nations condemned this act of aggression. For the first time in its history, the U.N. created a United Nations Command, with the United States acting as its executive agent, to repel the attack of North Korea and prevent Communist domination. In addition to the United States and South Korea, twenty other nations provided military contingents which served under the United Nations banner.
The fighting raged on for more than three years, as the U.N. forces drove the North Koreans from the Republic of South Korea and then stemmed the tide of the Chinese Communist Army attacks. The active hostilities ended with an armistice on July 27, 1953.
Because there has never been a political settlement of the war, an uneasy peace still reigns over the Korean peninsula. The provisions of the armistice agreement still constitute, among other things, a de facto boundary between the two Koreas.
For a number of reasons, the Korean War remains "The Forgotten War" and this neglect constitutes a great tragedy. By erecting a beautiful and inspiring memorial to those who served their country in Korea during one of the most significant military campaigns in the twentieth century, we can rectify this situation and give meaning to those who served our country.
This memorial can be viewed from different perspectives. On one level we want to honor and recognize those men and women who served in Korea; those who died, those who survived, and those who remain missing in action. On a second level, we want to educate the residents of Western Pennsylvania and the Tri-State area about what has come to be known as "The Forgotten War" and through the mechanism of the Korean War Veterans' Memorial, to foster an expanded awareness of how duty, courage and sacrifice are embedded within the American spirit.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 326 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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