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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Spotsylvania in Spotsylvania County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Here Fell General Alexander Hays

 
 
Gen. Alexander Hays Mortuary Cannon image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 10, 2007
1. Gen. Alexander Hays Mortuary Cannon
The Clover on the monument is the symbol of the 2nd Corps of the Army of the Potomac.
Inscription.
Here
fell
General
Alexander Hays
3rd Div. 2nd Corps. U.S.V.
May 5, 1864.


Erected by
General Alexander Hays Post No. 3
Department of Pennsylvania G.A.R.
and
Davis Star Camp, Sons of Veterans

 
Erected by General Alexander Hays Post No. 3 Department of Pennsylvania G.A.R. and Davis Star Camp, Sons of Veterans.
 
Location. 38° 18.171′ N, 77° 42.557′ W. Marker is in Spotsylvania, Virginia, in Spotsylvania County. Marker is at the intersection of Brock Road (Virginia Route 613) and Plank Road (County Route 621), on the right when traveling south on Brock Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Spotsylvania VA 22551, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 12th Regiment New Jersey Volunteers 1862 - 1865 (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); No Turning Back (about 700 feet away); On to Richmond! (about 700 feet away); Horror on the Orange Plank Road (about 800 feet away); The Climax (approx. 0.2 miles away); Valuable Crossroads (approx. 0.2 miles away); Echoes Homeward (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hell Itself (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Spotsylvania.
 
More about this marker.
Close Up of Inscription image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 16, 2008
2. Close Up of Inscription
A very small pull off area allows one or two cars at a time to view this mortuary monument. However traffic on this section of the battlefield is often very heavy. Visitors are encouraged to walk to the site from the Brock Road-Plank Road Intersection tour stop.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of the Wilderness. (Submitted on March 8, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
2. General Alexander Hays. Short biographical sketch. (Submitted on March 9, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Hays' Grave Site. More cannon surround Hays' grave site in Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania. (Submitted on March 9, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. 42-pounder Seacoast Gun Pattern of 1845
The gun used for the mortuary monument here is a large seacoast gun made from a pattern dating to 1845. On the right trunnion the markings are "R.P.P." and "W.P.F." for Robert Parker Parrott owner of West Point foundry where the weapon was produced. On the left trunnion is the date of manufacture, 1859. This indicates the gun was one of 34 produced by the foundry in that year. A reinforcing band around the breech (where the cannon meets the base), similar to those used on rifled Parrott guns. Presumably the gun displayed here had rifling applied after manufacture. Such
Base of Gen. Hays Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 10, 2007
3. Base of Gen. Hays Monument
was common early in the Civil War when the need for large caliber rifled guns outpaced production. Older models were taken in hand for conversion to fill the gap.
    — Submitted March 9, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Gen. Hays Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 10, 2007
4. Gen. Hays Monument
This monument marks the spot where Gen. Alexander Hays was killed on May 5, 1864, during the Battle of the Wilderness.
Gen. Hays' Death Site image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 10, 2007
5. Gen. Hays' Death Site
Hays' mortuary monument is on the Brock Road, just north of the strategic intersection with the Orange Plank Road.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,115 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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