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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bentonville in Johnston County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Texas

 
 
Texas State Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, August 18, 2006
1. Texas State Monument
Inscription. (Front Inscription):
Texas
remembers the valor and devotion of her sons who served at Bentonville March 19-21, 1865

The eighth Texas cavalry was engaged with the left wing of Sherman’s Union army on the eve of the Battle of Bentonville. During the battle on March 21, the eighth Texas again performed valuable service in the Confederate attack on Union General Mower’s Division of the Seventeenth Army Corps. Lieutenant-General William J. Hardee commanding a corps in the battle, ordered about 80 men of the eighth Texas commanded by Captain “Doc” Matthews, a mere boy, to oppose Mower’s advance the Texans attacked in conjunction with other cavalry commanded by General Wheeler and Lieutenant-General Wade Hampton and Cumming’s Georgia Brigade. Young “Willie” Hardee, General Hardee’s only son, charged with the eighth Texas and was killed. Under heavy Confederate pressure, Mower soon withdrew his division to its original position. During the Confederate retreat from Bentonville the eighth and eleventh Texas cavalry played a prominent role.
(See Other Side)

(Rear Inscription):
In opposing the Union pursuit from Mill Creek Bridge until the pursuers withdrew at Hannah’s Creek, the Texans were surrendered with the remnants of the Army of Tennessee at Greensboro, North Carolina
Rear of Texas Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, August 3, 2010
2. Rear of Texas Marker
in May 1865.

Texas units at Bentonville
6th     7th     10th     and   15th   Texas Infantry
17th     18th     24th     and   25th   Dismounted
Cavalry     8th   11th   Texas Cavalry

A memorial to Texans
who served the Confederacy
Erected by the State of Texas     1964

 
Erected 1964 by State of Texas.
 
Location. 35° 18.138′ N, 78° 19.234′ W. Marker is in Bentonville, North Carolina, in Johnston County. Marker is on Harper House Road (County Route 1008), on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Texas monument is located near the Bentonville Battlefield Visitors Center. Marker is in this post office area: Four Oaks NC 27524, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. North Carolina Monument (a few steps from this marker); Honoring the Dead of the Battle of Bentonville (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Dead Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); North Carolinians at the Battle of Bentonville (within shouting distance of this marker);
Texas Monument at Bentonville Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, August 3, 2010
3. Texas Monument at Bentonville
Bentonville Battlefield Driving Tour (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Union Headquarters (about 500 feet away); Bentonville Battlefield (about 600 feet away).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. One of a set of Texas Civil War Memorials
 
Also see . . .  Bentonville Battlefield. North Carolina Historic Sites website. (Submitted on March 8, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Texas Civil War Monuments
This marker is one of 19 monuments placed by the State of Texas on battlefields across the nation, preserving the memories of the contributions made by the state’s military units during the Civil War.

In 1961 the Texas Civil War Centennial Commission and the Texas State Historical Survey Committee initiated this commemorative series of granite monuments by dedicating the first and largest of the original Centennial monuments at Vicksburg National Military Park, Mississippi. Over the next three years monuments were also placed in the towns of Pea Ridge, Arkansas and Anthony,
Markers at Bentonville Battlefield Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, August 3, 2010
4. Markers at Bentonville Battlefield
The Texas Monument is located near the Battlefield Museum seen in the photo. Also visible is the North Carolina Monument on the left.
Texas (for the Arizona-New Mexico campaign) and at the following battlefields: Chickamauga, Georgia; Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia; Mansfield, Louisiana; Antietam, Maryland; Bentonville, North Carolina; Gettysburg, Pennsylvania; Fort Donelson, Tennessee; Shiloh, Tennessee; and The Wilderness, Virginia.

Starting in 1998, the Texas Historical Commission continued the work begun in 1961 by the Centennial Commission and the Historical Survey Committee by placing granite monuments at other Civil War battlefields. As of 2014, monuments have been placed at the battlefields of Galveston, Texas (1998); Raymond, Mississippi (2002); Rowlett’s Station, Kentucky (2008); Richmond, Kentucky (2009); Corinth, Mississippi (2010); Gaines Mill
Texas Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, August 18, 2006
5. Texas Monument
The Texas Monument is located near a North Carolina Monument.
, Virginia(2012); and Second Manassas, Virginia (2012).

The Texas Historical Commission plans to place a monument at the battlefield of Glorieta Pass, New Mexico.

(Source: Texas Historical Commission, 2015)

NOTE: The links above will take you the HMdb record for the Texas Monument of that battle or campaign.
    — Submitted July 17, 2016, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Bentonville Battlefield Visitors Center Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, August 18, 2006
6. Bentonville Battlefield Visitors Center
The Texas monument is located near the Visitors Center (just to the left of the sign). Also visible are the North Carolina Monument, the Confederate cemetery, the Monument to the Confederate Dead, and some preserved earthworks.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,358 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5, 6. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on August 12, 2016.
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