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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Broad Run in Fauquier County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Campaign of Second Manassas

 
 
Campaign of Second Manassas Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, June 3, 2006
1. Campaign of Second Manassas Marker
Inscription. Lee and Longstreet, moving eastward to join Jackson at Manassas, found this gap held by a Union force, August 28, 1862. They forced the gap, after some fighting, and moved on toward Manassas, August 29, 1862.
 
Erected 1928 by Conservation & Development Commission. (Marker Number FA-1.)
 
Location. 38° 49.411′ N, 77° 42.653′ W. Marker is near Broad Run, Virginia, in Fauquier County. Marker is at the intersection of John Marshall Highway (Virginia Route 55) and Beverleys Mill Road, on the right when traveling west on John Marshall Highway. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Broad Run VA 20137, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Thoroughfare Gap (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Thoroughfare Gap (here, next to this marker); Chapman's Mill (approx. ¼ mile away); Free People Of Color At Thoroughfare (approx. 1.9 miles away); Antioch Church (approx. 2.8 miles away); Hopewell Gap (approx. 2.8 miles away); Buckland (approx. 3.6 miles away); Battle of Buckland Mills (approx. 3.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Broad Run.
 
Related markers. Click here
Three Markers at the Route 55 Pulloff image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 31, 2009
2. Three Markers at the Route 55 Pulloff
for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .  Battle of Thoroughfare Gap or Chapman's Mill. (Submitted on October 6, 2006.)
 
Additional comments.
1. One Soldier’s Story
Transcription of text on interpretative sign on photo No. 2

W.H. Andrews of the Georgia Regulars described the fighting that took place at this spot on August 28, 1862:

“The [ridge] ... was covered with trees and bushes so that you could not see any distance ahead ... When within 50 fee of the [quarry] ... the air was so full of lead, I dropped on my hands and knees and crawled ... until I reached the ditch. I then poked my gun over the loose dirt and fired.

“I was near enough to the federal line to have touched bayonets with the man in front of me ... [The Federals were positioned along the far] edge of the ditch in a solid line of battle, while the regulars were every may for himself. We soon routed [them] ... from their position and they tumbled down their side of the mountain; but halted within 50 yards, reformed and came at us again. [They] charged up to the ditch and fired a volley with not a rebel in sight but as soon as their guns were empty a sheet
One Soldier's Story image. Click for full size.
November 17, 2006
3. One Soldier's Story
Informational marker along the Bull Run Mountains Conservancy trail near Beverley's Mill.
of flame burst forth from every tree, stump and rock on top of the mountain. In a short time we routed them again and as they tumbled down the side of the mountain the [Georgia] boys sprang to the ditch to give them a parting shot.”

Taken from “The Battle of Thoroughfare Gap,” an article in Civil War magazine by Noel Harrison.
    — Submitted December 2, 2008.

 
Additional keywords. General James Longstreet, General Robert E. Lee, Thoroughfare Gap, General James Ricketts
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Quarry Trench at Thoroughfare Gap image. Click for full size.
November 17, 2006
4. Quarry Trench at Thoroughfare Gap
On Bull Run Mountain near Beverley's Mill.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota. This page has been viewed 1,836 times since then and 6 times this year. Last updated on , by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota.   2. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on . • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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