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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Shafter in Presidio County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Milton Faver

 
 
Milton Faver Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 22, 2012
1. Milton Faver Marker
Inscription.
Here
Milton Faver
established in the fifties the first
Anglo-American owned ranch
in the Big Bend
Three quadrangular adobe fortresses
situated at the Big Springs
Cibolo, Cienaga and La Morita
served as a defense against
hostile Apaches

 
Erected 1936 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 3390.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Texas 1936 Centennial Markers and Monuments marker series.
 
Location. 29° 48.933′ N, 104° 18.404′ W. Marker is in Shafter, Texas, in Presidio County. Marker is on Cibolo Creek Road 0.3 miles east of U.S. 67, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Marfa TX 79843, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Brooks Cemetery (approx. 0.3 miles away); Milton Faver Ranches (approx. 5 miles away); a different marker also named Milton Faver (approx. 5.6 miles away).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Probably the best webpage on Shafter. (Submitted on September 15, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
Milton Faver Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 22, 2012
2. Milton Faver Marker

2. From The Handbook of Texas. Unfortunately, just as Shafter doesn't get a fair shake elsewhere, this article doesn't do justice to Shafter itself. (Submitted on September 15, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Shafter, a Texas Ghost Town
This marker is located near the ruins of the Shafter Silver mine.

Shafter is, in my opinion, the most interesting ghost town in Texas, yet it gets short shrift. Of course I haven't been to them all, but it's never mentioned in the lists of Texas Ghost Towns. Nearby Terlingua get's rave reviews and is considered by many Texas most interesting ghost town. Pshaw! I've been to both and if you weren't told you were in Terlingua and that it was a ghost town there's a good chance you wouldn't know. Indianola, called the queen of Texas ghost towns, was undoubtedly a thriving city and port in the 1800's but there's nothing left, nothing to see there today. No such problem in Shafter -- you know you're in a strange and somewhat eerie place. Shafter is in the National List of Historic places. Silver was mined here from the late 1800s until mid 1900. Those things you see in the background of the wide view of the marker are silver mining ruins. It was a company town. In
Milton Faver Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 22, 2012
3. Milton Faver Marker
the early days the company essentially owned the miners. The Shafter cemetery is witness to the deaths there. Unfortunately there's no historical marker to Shafter itself, so I'm doing the best I can to create one by adding to this one. Recently there has been an attempt to start silver mining again in Shafter but things aren't going well.
    — Submitted September 15, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.

 
Categories. AgricultureForts, Castles
 
Shafter Sign image. Click for full size.
4. Shafter Sign
Possible Ruins of Shafter Silver Smelter or Mine image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, circa July 15, 2009
5. Possible Ruins of Shafter Silver Smelter or Mine
Possible Ruins of Shafter Silver Smelter or Mine image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, circa June 15, 2009
6. Possible Ruins of Shafter Silver Smelter or Mine
Shafter Worker Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, circa June 15, 2009
7. Shafter Worker Cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 406 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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