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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mount Vernon in Fairfax County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Mount Vernon Estate

 
 
Mount Vernon Estate Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, January 15, 2007
1. Mount Vernon Estate Marker
Inscription. George Washington acquired Mount Vernon in 1754. Over a period of 30 years, he transformed the simple farmhouse into a mansion embellished with rusticated wood siding, a cupola, and a portico overlooking the Potomac River. Every aspect of the estate—its architecture and decoration, the landscape and the farms—received Washington’s careful attention, despite long absences during the Revolution and his presidency. Washington kept Mount Vernon as his home until his death on 14 December 1799. Since 1858, the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association has maintained and meticulously restored the estate as a true reflection of Washington’s character and personality.
 
Erected 1999 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number E-68.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the George Washington Slept Here, the National Historic Landmarks, and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization marker series.
 
Location. 38° 42.703′ N, 77° 5.3′ W. Marker is in Mount Vernon, Virginia, in Fairfax County. Marker is at the intersection of Mount Vernon Memorial Highway (Virginia Route 235) and Mount Vernon Highway, on the right when traveling east on Mount Vernon Memorial Highway. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Alexandria VA 22309, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Mount Vernon Estate Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, January 27, 2007
2. Mount Vernon Estate Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Washington-Rochambeau Route to Victory (within shouting distance of this marker); Washington-Rochambeau Route (within shouting distance of this marker); The Mount Vernon Memorial Highway (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); Origin of the Purple Heart Trail (about 800 feet away); Park and Parkway (approx. 0.2 miles away); Welcome to Mount Vernon (approx. ¼ mile away); Powel Coach (approx. 0.3 miles away); Tomb of Washington (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Mount Vernon.
 
More about this marker. A marker with this title and number was originally erected in the late 1920s on Richmond Highway, now U.S. Route 1, 5 miles south of the Alexandria city line. The original marker read, “ Two miles to the east, the original house was built in 1743 by Lawrence Washington. George Washington came into possession in 1752. From here he set out, in April 1775, to take his seat in the Continental Congress. On December 24, 1783, he returned from the army and here died on December 14, 1799.”
 
Also see . . .
1. Mount Vernon. (Submitted on March 5, 2007, by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota.)
2. UNESCO World Heritage Site,Tentative List: Mount Vernon. (Submitted on November 14, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
Original Entrance to Mount Vernon image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, February 4, 2007
3. Original Entrance to Mount Vernon
This was the original entrance to the mansion, on Old Mount Vernon Highway. The other once often-used method of access was by boat. The Potomac River is directly behind the mansion.

 
Additional keywords. UNESCO World Heritage Site
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
West Side of Mount Vernon image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 10, 2008
4. West Side of Mount Vernon
East Side Mount Vernon image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 10, 2008
5. East Side Mount Vernon
National Historic Landmark - 1960 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 5, 2008
6. National Historic Landmark - 1960
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota. This page has been viewed 1,909 times since then and 35 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota.   4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   6. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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