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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charlottesville, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

University of Virginia

 
 
University of Virginia Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 15, 2008
1. University of Virginia Marker
Inscription. Thomas Jefferson founded the University of Virginia. The cornerstone of its first building was laid on October 6, 1817, in the presence of three presidents of the United States—Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe. In 1825, the university admitted its first scholars, who were educated in what Jefferson called “useful sciences.” Following Jefferson’s beliefs, the university was nonsectarian and allowed its students to choose their own courses of study. The honor system was established in 1842. In 1987, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) named the original grounds, Thomas Jefferson’s “academical village,” to its prestigious World Heritage List.
 
Erected 2003 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number I-3.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization marker series.
 
Location. 38° 2.193′ N, 78° 30.21′ W. Marker is in Charlottesville, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of University Avenue (Business U.S. 250) and Rugby Road on University Avenue. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Charlottesville VA 22904, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
University of Virginia Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 15, 2008
2. University of Virginia Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Thomas Jefferson Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Henry Martin (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); James Monroe’s First Farm (about 400 feet away); Edgar Allan Poe (about 600 feet away); William Holding Echols (approx. 0.2 miles away); Kappa Sigma Fraternity (approx. 0.2 miles away); The University “Corner” (approx. 0.2 miles away); Technical Sergeant Frank D. Peregory (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Charlottesville.
 
More about this marker. The Charlottesville city limit traces its way around the university grounds. The University of Virginia is not in officially the City of Charlottesville.

This marker replaces a marker with the same title and number that was erected in the early 1930s. It read “This institution was founded by Thomas Jefferson. The cornerstone of the first building was laid, on October 6, 1817, in the presence of three Presidents of the United States, Jefferson, Madison, and Monroe, all members of the Board of Visitors. It became the state university in 1819 and was opened to instruction in 1825. The university was conducted by the faculty until 1904, when the first president was elected.”
 
Related marker. Click here for
University of Virginia Marker, Rotunda Behind on Right image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 15, 2008
3. University of Virginia Marker, Rotunda Behind on Right
another marker that is related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Short History of U.Va. “[Thomas Jefferson developed plans] for ten Pavilions—stately faculty homes with living quarters upstairs and classrooms downstairs—attached to two rows of student rooms and connected by an inward-facing colonnade. Each Pavilion was identified with a subject to be studied and inhabited by the professor who taught that subject. At the head of the shared lawn would stand the library (not, as in most other colleges and universities of the time, a chapel), its dome shape inspired by Rome’s Pantheon and symbolic of the enlightened human mind. The plans grew to include two more colonnades of student rooms facing outwards and attached to a set of ‘hotels’ where private businessmen served food for the students.” (Submitted on June 30, 2008.) 

2. UNESCO World Heritage Site, Monticello and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. (Submitted on November 14, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Education
 
Thomas Jefferson Atop the Liberty Bell image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 15, 2008
4. Thomas Jefferson Atop the Liberty Bell
The Chapel image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 15, 2008
5. The Chapel
Lawn of the Academical Village image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 15, 2008
6. Lawn of the Academical Village
Old Cabell Hall is in the southern distance. Pavilions and student rooms are east and west. The Rotunda is behind the photographer.
A Pavilion image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 15, 2008
7. A Pavilion
Student Rooms Between Pavilions image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 15, 2008
8. Student Rooms Between Pavilions
George Washington, Facing the Lawn image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 15, 2008
9. George Washington, Facing the Lawn
1913 bronze cast of the 1788 marble portrait by Jean Antoine Houdon (1741–1828) is approx 5½ feet high on a 3¾ foot base. It was dedicated in 1913.
Thomas Jefferson, Across the Lawn from George Washington image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 15, 2008
10. Thomas Jefferson, Across the Lawn from George Washington
1915 bronze by Karl Bitter (1867–1915) is a little over 4 feet tall on a four foot base. The inscription on the base reads “I am closing the last scene of my life by fashioning and fostering an establishment for the instruction of those who come after us. I hope that its influence on their virtue, freedom, fame and happiness will be salutory and permanent.”
Homer and Student at Old Cabell Hall at the South End of the Academical Village image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 15, 2008
11. Homer and Student at Old Cabell Hall at the South End of the Academical Village
“Homer,” by Moses Jacob Ezekiel image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 15, 2008
12. “Homer,” by Moses Jacob Ezekiel
1907 bronze by Sir Moses Jacob Ezekiel (1844–1917) is approx 6 feet tall on a 3½ foot base. A Homer's feet is his Egyptian student and guide.
The Rotunda (1826) image. Click for full size.
By Paul Crumlish, October 15, 2011
13. The Rotunda (1826)
The centerpiece of the University of Virginia, it was designed by Thomas Jefferson, destroyed by a fire it was renovated by Stanford White in 1898. It was last renovated to Jefferson's design in 1976.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,376 times since then and 30 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   9, 10, 11. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   12. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   13. submitted on , by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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