Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Colmar Manor in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Storming the Bridge

Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail

 
 
Storming the Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 13, 2012
1. Storming the Bridge Marker
Inscription. A wooden bridge just upriver became the focal point on August 24, 1814, when American and British forces clashed in the Battle of Bladensburg. The British approached from the east, clarifying their intent -- to invade Washington. The Americans formed three defensive lines: the first here to protect the bridge, the second along present-day 40th Avenue, and the third at Fort Lincoln Cemetery at the District Line. At 1:00p.m. the British stormed the bridge.

"The [Americans] were drawn up in three lines upon the brow of a hill...This river flowed between the heights occupied by the American Forces, and the little town of Bladensburg. Across it was thrown a narrow bridge..." -- British Lieutenant. George Robert Gleig, eyewitness

Heat of Battle
More than 10,000 men battled here, sweltering in heavy uniforms. The British veteran force of 4,500, commanded by Major General Robert Ross, had marched for four days carrying loaded packs in near 100-degree heat.

Brigadier General. William H. Winder commanded about 6,000 Americans, including 1,000 regulars, 400 Chesapeake Flotilla crewmen, 114 marines and inexperienced militia.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Star Spangled Banner National Historic Trail marker series.
 
Location.
Storming the Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 14, 2012
2. Storming the Bridge Marker
38° 56.284′ N, 76° 56.586′ W. Marker is in Colmar Manor, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on Bladensburg Road (Alternate U.S. 1), on the left when traveling west. Click for map. At the west end of the Anacostia River bridge along the Anacostia River Trail near The National News Agency at 4331 Bladensburg Road. Marker is in this post office area: Brentwood MD 20722, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Crossroads of Trade and Travel (here, next to this marker); The Road to the Capital (here, next to this marker); Veterans Memorial (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); World War II Honor Roll (about 800 feet away); Peace Cross (about 800 feet away); Undaunted In Battle (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Road to the Capital (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bladensburg Monuments (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Colmar Manor.
 
Additional comments.
1. The illustration
The background illustration on this marker is "The Battle of Bladensburg" by Richard Schlecht.
    — Submitted November 15, 2012, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.

 
Categories. War of 1812
 
The present-day Anacostia River bridge with the Storming the Bridge marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 13, 2012
3. The present-day Anacostia River bridge with the Storming the Bridge marker
Heat of Battle image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 13, 2012
4. Heat of Battle
More than 10,000 men battled here, sweltering in heavy uniforms.The British veteran force of 4,500, commanded by General Robert Ross, had marched for four days carrying loaded packs in near 100-degree heat.

Brigadier General William H. Winder commanded about 6,000 Americans, including 1,000 regulars, 400 Chesapeake Flotilla crewmen, 114 marines, and inexperienced militia.
Close-up of Gerry Embleton painting on marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 372 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   4. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement