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Stoystown in Somerset County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Flight 93 National Memorial

National Park Service-U.S.Department of the Interior

 
 
Flight 93 National Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 16, 2011
1. Flight 93 National Memorial Marker
Inscription. On September 11, 2001, at 10:30 am, United Airlines Flight 93 crashed in the field in front of you, killing all 40 passengers and crew members, as well as the four terrorists who hijacked the aircraft. The plane came over the hill behind you and to your left, approximately 40-50 feet off the ground and at a speed of 563 miles per hour. Upon impact the 7,000 gallons of jet fuel on board the aircraft exploded, creating a ball of fire that rose higher than the trees. Because of the quick and determined actions of the passengers and crew, Flight 93 failed to reach the terrorists’ intended target. Flight 93 crashed less than 20 minutes flying-time from the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C.

When first responders and local citizens arrived, the crash site and adjacent trees were still smoldering and the ground was littered with fragments of the plane. The crash created a crater that was 15 feet deep and roughly 30 feet across. During the recovery and investigation, the crater was excavated to a depth of 40 feet to recover human remains, personal effects, parts of the aircraft, and evidence. On September 24, 2001, the FBI closed its field investigation and turned the site over to the Somerset County Coroner. The Coroner’s intent was to restore the site to its condition before September 11. The crater was backfilled, spread with a

Flight 93 National Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 16, 2011
2. Flight 93 National Memorial Marker
layer of topsoil, and then planted with grasses and wildflowers.

The Western Overlook
This entire area was used as a command post by the F.B.I. and the emergency response teams during the investigation and recovery. Today, this area serves as a temporary memorial until the first phase of the permanent memorial is dedicated on September 10, 2011. The building behind you houses a temporary exhibit on the story of Flight 93, the investigation/recovery efforts, and the complete memorial design.

Today
The crash site area is the final resting place of the passengers and crew. It is the heart of Flight 93 National Memorial and will remain untouched. Visitors will be able to view the crash site area from the Memorial Plaza that is under construction. The names of the 40 passengers and crew will be inscribed on the wall of the plaza as it follows the flight of the plane.

The Memorial Plaza will be dedicated and open to the public on the weekend of September 11, 2011.
 
Location. 40° 3.324′ N, 78° 54.006′ W. Marker is in Stoystown, Pennsylvania, in Somerset County. Marker is on Skyline Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Stoystown PA 15563, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Flight 93 National Memorial

Flight 93 National Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 16, 2011
3. Flight 93 National Memorial Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Flight 93 Temporary Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Flight 93 (approx. 0.3 miles away); “We're going to do something.” (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Investigation (approx. 0.3 miles away); America Attacked! (approx. 0.3 miles away); Mayday! (approx. 0.3 miles away); September 11, 2001 (approx. half a mile away).
 
Categories. Disasters
 
Flight 93 National Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 16, 2011
4. Flight 93 National Memorial Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 358 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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