Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Downtown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

White House Kitchen Garden

 
 
White House Kitchen Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, November 14, 2011
1. White House Kitchen Garden Marker
Inscription.
”. . . Now I shall plant, if at all, more for the public than for myself.” John Quincy Adams, diary entry for July 5, 1826, shortly before beginning the first major planting program at the White House. Massachusetts Historical Society

During his eight years as president (1801-09), Thomas Jefferson hired the White House’s first gardener, whose duties included the cultivation of a kitchen garden. However, it was
not until 1825, when John Quincy Adams became president, that the vegetable garden and surrounding grounds began to flourish. Adams established a tree seedling nursery
and an impressive two-acre garden filled with vegetables, herbs, and fruit trees, as well as flowers, shrubs, and shade trees.

By the 1840s, a new kitchen garden had been planted southwest of the White House, and a corresponding ornamental garden to the southeast. Most of the surviving records for this kitchen garden date to the administration of President Abraham Lincoln (1861-65). Receipts for seeds show that the Lincolns enjoyed an assortment of fresh fruits and vegetables. The kitchen garden was finally removed in 1871 during the presidency of Ulysses S. Grant, to make way for the construction of West Executive Avenue

First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt used the grounds during World
White House Kitchen Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, November 14, 2011
2. White House Kitchen Garden Marker
War II to showcase her avid support of a Civilian Defense program for producing home-grown fruits and vegetables. Under her guidance, 10-year-old Diana Hopkins planted a demonstration “victory garden” in a flower bed south of the East Garden in the spring of 1943.
Diana, who lived in the White House with her father, Harry Hopkins, advisor to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, maintained the garden throughout the summer as an example for Americans to follow nationwide.

In spring 2009, First Lady Michelle Obama, with the assistance of local schoolchildren, planted a new White House kitchen garden at the southwest end of the south grounds (to your left). This garden will provide fresh, seasonal produce for the first family to enjoy, and will educate American children about the importance of eating more vegetables and fruits as part of a healthier lifestyle.

"John Saul: Seed Voucher" [captions below illustrations, upper left:]
Local nurseryman and horticulturist John Saul (1819-97) supplied the seeds for the kitchen garden during the Lincoln administration. Under the guidance of the preeminent landscape gardener A.J. Downing, Saul also undertook the improvement of the National Mall, Smithsonian Grounds, Lafayette Square, and the Ellipse.

Receipts for seeds show that the Lincolns enjoyed an assortment of fresh fruits and
The present White House Kitchen Garden, behind the trees, west of the marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, November 14, 2011
3. The present White House Kitchen Garden, behind the trees, west of the marker
vegetables. Many of these selections, such as pears, strawberries, celery, carrots and lettuce are still common today.
John Saul, Receipt for Seed, Record Group 217, National Archives

". . . No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no culture comparable to that of the garden. Such a variety of subjects, some one always coming to perfection, the failure of one thing repaired by the success of another, and instead of one harvest, a continued one thro’ the year. Under a total want of demand except for our family table. I am still devoted to the garden. But tho’ an old man, I am but a young gardener."
- Thomas Jefferson, letter to Charles Willson Peale, Poplar Forest, August 20, 1811, Library of Congress.

1867 Landscape Plan
This color plan of the White House grounds includes the only known rendering of the historic kitchen garden, located immediately west (left) of the house itself. Drawn in 1867, the plan shows the approximately one-acre garden as it appeared during the presidency of Abraham Lincoln.
- Drawing No. 15, Record Group 121, National Archives.

From Planting to Harvest – White House Kitchen Garden Today:
[Three photos of the present garden: its seedling beds, harvested vegetables, and Michelle Obama
The White House - viewed from the Ellipse at the Kitchen Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, November 14, 2011
4. The White House - viewed from the Ellipse at the Kitchen Garden Marker
Note holiday decorations on the second and third floor balconies.
with visiting youngsters.]
 
Erected 2012 by National Park Service, Dept. of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 53.721′ N, 77° 2.192′ W. Marker is in Downtown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of E Street, NW and the Ellipse on E Street, NW. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington DC 20500, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Zero Milestone (within shouting distance of this marker); The National Christmas Tree (within shouting distance of this marker); William Tecumseh Sherman (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Division War Memorial (about 700 feet away); Alexander Hamilton Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); Boy Scout Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); Original Patentees Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); The United States Treasury (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Downtown.
 
More about this marker. Marker is on the south White House lawn, inside the fence off E Street, north of the Ellipse - accessible to pedestrians only.
 
Also see . . .  White House Vegetable Garden. (Submitted on January 6, 2013, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama; President's Park
 
Categories. AgricultureGovernmentHorticulture & ForestryNotable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 418 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on September 10, 2016.
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