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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fort Oglethorpe in Walker County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Agony of the Wounded

 
 
Agony of the Wounded Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 17, 2012
1. Agony of the Wounded Marker
Inscription.
The Snodgrass Cabin
served as a field hospital.


In 1863 George Snodgrass and his family of nine lived in a log house here. On the second day of the Battle of Chickamauga, Union forces made a desperate stand in the woods and fields surrounding the cabin, forcing the Snodgrass family to take cover in a nearby ravine with other refugees.

Thousands fell as Confederates attacked Union positions on Snodgrass Hill that afternoon. It was some of the war's bloodiest fighting, and the Snodgrass Cabin soon filled with wounded. That evening the Federals evacuated, leaving behind many wounded who could not be moved. For several days injured soldiers from both sides were treated here.

Army doctors found it difficult to cope with the great numbers of casualties and the ghastly wounds. Amputation was the standard treatment for the arms or legs smashed by bullets or shells. Anesthetics such as chloroform and ether were in use during this period, but were in short supply at Chickamauga.

Casualties at Chickamauga
Union

Of 58,000 engaged
————————
Killed .... 1,656
Wounded ... 9,749
Missing ... 4,774
————————
Total
Agony of the Wounded Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 17, 2012
2. Agony of the Wounded Marker
View of the historical marker situated just south of the Snodgrass House.
.... 16,179

Confederate
Of 66,000 engaged
————————
Killed .... 2,673
Wounded .. 16,274
Missing ... 2,003
————————
Total .... 20,950
[Caption under large picture]:

A Confederate surgeon amputates a soldier's arm in an effort to save his life. Amputations needed to be performed quickly - in fifteen minutes or less under battlefield conditions.

Because of its proximity to the heavy fighting on Snodgrass Hill, the Snodgrass cabin was used by both armies as a hospital. The building has been restored by the National Park Service.

[Caption under small picture]:

Selected equipment and supplies used by army surgeons at field hospitals. Some of the surgical instruments are nearly identical to those used today.
 
Erected by Chickamauga-Chattanooga National Military Park.
 
Location. 34° 55.746′ N, 85° 16.099′ W. Marker is near Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, in Walker County. Marker is on Vittetoe Road west of Vittetoe-Chickamauga Road, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. This historical marker is located in the northwest section of the
Agony of the Wounded Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 17, 2012
3. Agony of the Wounded Marker
Close-up view of the text seen on the historical marker.
Chickamauga National Military Park, along a ridge called Snodgrass Hill. To view this historical marker drive to the parking area in front of the Snodgrass House and the marker can be seen situated just to the south of the Snodgrass House. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Oglethorpe GA 30742, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battery I, 4th U.S. Artillery. (a few steps from this marker); Battery I, Fourth U.S. Artillery (a few steps from this marker); Wood's Division (within shouting distance of this marker); Sirwell's Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); 3rd Kentucky Infantry (USA) (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 37th Indiana Infantry (about 300 feet away); Harker's Brigade (about 300 feet away); 64th Ohio Infantry (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Oglethorpe.
 
More about this marker. This historical marker is located at stop 8 on the Chickamauga Battlefield Tour Route, that was created for this National Military Park.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Agony of the Wounded Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 18, 2012
4. Agony of the Wounded Marker
A Confederate surgeon amputates a soldier's arm in an effort to save his life. Amputations needed to be performed quickly - in fifteen minutes or less under battlefield conditions. Because of its proximity to the heavy fighting on Snodgrass Hill, the Snodgrass cabin was used by both armies as a hospital. The building has been restored by the National Park Service.
Agony of the Wounded Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 18, 2012
5. Agony of the Wounded Marker
Selected equipment and supplies used by army surgeons at field hospitals. Some of the surgical instruments are nearly identical to those used today.
Agony of the Wounded Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 18, 2012
6. Agony of the Wounded Marker
View of the "Tour," stop "8" marker, in the foreground, with the historical marker and the Snodgrass House in the background.
Snodgrass House image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 17, 2012
7. Snodgrass House
View of the northeast side of the Snodgrass House.
Snodgrass Hill Battlefield Site image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 17, 2012
8. Snodgrass Hill Battlefield Site
View of the Union Regimental Monuments and the historical tablets situated just northeast of the Snodgrass House.
Agony of the Wounded Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 17, 2012
9. Agony of the Wounded Marker
Surgeon inside Snodgrass Cabin image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, September 20, 2008
10. Surgeon inside Snodgrass Cabin
145th Anniversary Reenactment
Snodgrass Cabin image. Click for full size.
By William Henry Jackson, 1902
11. Snodgrass Cabin
The Snodgrass House, Thomas' Headquarters, Chickamauga, Tenn. [i.e. Ga.] Courtesy of the Library of Congress
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 297 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   10, 11. submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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