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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Georgetown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Old Stone House

1766

 
 
Old Stone House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 14, 2009
1. Old Stone House Marker
Inscription. The Old Stone House, part of the Landmark District of Georgetown, is the only surviving pre-Revolutionary building in the capital. The house stands on its original site, lot #3, one of eighty lots surveyed in the port of Georgetown in 1751.

Christopher Layman, a carpenter, is believed to have begun construction of the house in 1764. In 1766 Layman’s widow, Rachael, had the front portion of the house completed. The National Park Service acquired the building during the Sesquicentennial of Washington under an act of Congress approved September 25, 1950.
 
Location. 38° 54.321′ N, 77° 3.616′ W. Marker is in Georgetown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on M Street NW. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3051 M Street NW, Washington DC 20007, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Nathan Loughborough's Houses (a few steps from this marker); Thomas Sim Lee Corner (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Ross and Getty House (about 300 feet away); M Street - A Road Well Traveled (about 300 feet away); Georgetown and the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal (about 400 feet

Old Stone House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 14, 2009
2. Old Stone House Marker
away); Creating a National Park (about 400 feet away); At All Hours (about 400 feet away); Herman Hollerith (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Georgetown.
 
Also see . . .  The Old Stone House - National Park Service. (Submitted on December 21, 2012, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable Buildings
 
Old Stone House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 14, 2009
3. Old Stone House Marker
Old Stone House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 14, 2009
4. Old Stone House Marker
Old Stone House Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 9, 2016
5. Old Stone House Marker
A simple, laminated print-out has been taped over the marker. It reads: Old Stone House: The oldest home and property in Washington, D.C., First constructed in 1765 and completed by around 1780, Old Stone House is the only pre-Revolutionary War building still standing within the District of Columbia. The adjacent garden, remaining from the founding of Georgetown in 1751. Acquired by the National Park Service in the 1950s, Old Stone House is currently open 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Wednesday through Sunday and includes a free museum and bookstore. (The museum and giftshop are actually open Monday through Sunday)
Old Stone House Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 9, 2016
6. Old Stone House Marker
As described in the original marker, this is a view of the original lot of the Old Stone House, seen from the north looking south at the house.
The Old Stone House image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 9, 2016
7. The Old Stone House
The Old Stone House main kitchen and living area image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 9, 2016
8. The Old Stone House main kitchen and living area
The Old Stone House dining area, including the Suter clock. image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 9, 2016
9. The Old Stone House dining area, including the Suter clock.
Old Stone House living area and bedroom on the second floor. image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 9, 2016
10. Old Stone House living area and bedroom on the second floor.
Old Stone House attic and third floor children's room. image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 9, 2016
11. Old Stone House attic and third floor children's room.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 486 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on January 27, 2017.
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