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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Beeler in Ness County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Homestead of a Genius

 
 
Homestead of a Genius Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 7, 2010
1. Homestead of a Genius Marker
Inscription. A mile and half south is a quarter section of land originally homesteaded by George Washington Carver. An African American and one of America's great scientists, Carver revolutionized agriculture in the South with his discoveries. From sweet potatoes and peanuts alone, he made paint, soap, wallboard, milk substitute, medicines, cosmetics, and some 500 other products.

Born in Missouri around 1864, Carver came to Kansas in 1878 seeking an education. He lived first in Fort Scott, and later in Olathe, Paola, and Highland. In 1880 he joined friends to homestead near Minneapolis where he attended high school. In 1886 Carver moved to Ness County. After deciding on the land that he wished to homestead, he built a sod house and occupied it while working his claim.

Carver eventually left to pursue a college degree in Iowa. In 1896 after he completed his master's degree in agriculture, Carver joined the faculty of Tuskegee Institute in Alabama where he spent more than 40 years teaching and researching.
 
Erected by Kansas State Historical Society and Kansas Department of Transportation. (Marker Number 79.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Kansas Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 38° 
Homestead of a Genius Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 12, 2012
2. Homestead of a Genius Marker
Town of Beeler in distance
27.037′ N, 100° 11.985′ W. Marker is near Beeler, Kansas, in Ness County. Marker is on State Highway 96 0.1 miles east of C Rd, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is located at a pullout on the south side of the highway. Marker is in this post office area: Beeler KS 67518, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. George Washington Carver (approx. 1.6 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  George Washington Carver Biography. (Submitted on December 21, 2012, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Location of Carver Homestead
The northeast corner of the Carver Homestead, with a 1952 historical marker, is accessible from a county road. To reach the homestead from this marker, travel east on Highway 96 for 0.3 miles to County Road 523, then proceed south for 1.5 miles.
    — Submitted July 11, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.

2. Original Marker
In the late 1950s the first marker "Homestead of a Genius" was placed along Kansas Route 96 to commemorate the nearby homestead of George Washington Carver. This original marker was of the same type,
Homestead of George Washington Carver image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 7, 2010
3. Homestead of George Washington Carver
design, and title as the present marker, but the text of the marker was different. The original 1950s marker said:
Homestead of a Genius

A mile and a half south is a quarter section which was homesteaded by one of the great scientist of America, George Washington Carver. Through his discoveries, agriculture in the South was revolutionized. From sweet potatoes and peanuts alone he made paint, soap, wallboard, milk, medicines, cosmetics and 500 other products, worth millions of dollars. A Negro, whose parents were slaves, he has been called a genius.

Carver was born in Missouri in 1864. He came to Kansas as a boy, drifting from Fort Scott to Paola, Olathe, Minneapolis and Highland. He did odd jobs, took in washings, cooked, attending school when he could. At 17, classed with 6th graders in Minneapolis, he was reported "perfect in deportment." He was 22 when he homesteaded here, and built a sod house. Two years later he mortgaged his claim to go to college. At 32, with a master's degree, he went to Tuskegee Institute, Alabama, on a salary of $1,500. Although Edison once offered him $100,000 a year, he remained there until his death in 1943.

Erected by Kansas Historical Society and State Highway Commission
By 2007 the present marker was installed with revised language, replacing the original marker.
    — Submitted February 20, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.

 
Categories. African Americans
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 371 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.   2. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   3. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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