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Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Tamanend

 
 
Tamanend Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
1. Tamanend Marker
Inscription. In honor of the contributions of Native American Indians—the ancestors, the elders, this generation, and the generations to come—this sculpture commemorates Tamanend, a Sakima, of the Lenni-Lenape nation who resided in the Delaware Valley when Philadelphia, or “Coaquannock” was established.

Tamanend stands on a turtle, which represents Mother Earth. The eagle, a revered messenger of the Great Spirit has a wampum belt in its grasp. This belt recognizes the friendship treaty under the Shackamaxon Elm between William Penn (“Mikwon”), Tamanend (“the Affable One”) and other leaders of the Lenni-Lenape nation. It reads—“to live in peace as long as the waters run in the rivers and creeks and as long as the stars and moon endure.”

Penn dealt with the Lenni-Lenape people when he came to the land given him by the King of England. He bought the land from the Lenni-Lenape through a number of treaties. Tamanend was one of the Sakimas who played a prominent role as a welcoming delegate on Penn’s arrival in 1682, and in the early treaties of 1683 and 1692.

Tamanend was considered the patron saint of America by the colonists prior to American Independence. Tamarend Day was celebrated annually on May 1st in Philadelphia and bells were rung in his honor.
Tamanend Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
2. Tamanend Monument

 
Erected 1996 by City of Philadelphia Department of Streets, Delta Group Landscape Architects, Enginners, Architects, United American Indians of Delaware Valley, Historic East Market Street. • Raymond Sandoval, Artist.
 
Location. 39° 56.982′ N, 75° 8.52′ W. Marker is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia County. Marker is at the intersection of Front Street and Market Street, on the right when traveling north on Front Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Front and Market Streets, Philadelphia PA 19106, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. London Coffee House (within shouting distance of this marker); Philip Syng, Jr. (within shouting distance of this marker); Robert Aitken (1734-1802) (within shouting distance of this marker); Christ Church (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Resting Place of Seven Signers of the Declaration of Independence (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Christ Church (about 600 feet away); James Wilson (about 600 feet away); Lorenzo L. Langstroth (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Philadelphia.
 
More about this marker. The Tamanend Statue was one of the first sculptures
Tamanend Sculpture image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
3. Tamanend Sculpture
1996 bronze by Raymond Sandoval
of a Native American in the United States. There is talk of moving it to Philadelphia's Penn Treaty Park.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia Entry for Tamanend. “It is believed that Tamanend died in 1698. Over the next century, many folk legends surrounded Tamanend and his fame assumed mythical proportions among the people of Philadelphia, who began to call him ‘King Tammany,’ ‘Saint Tammany,’ and the ‘Patron Saint of America.’ The people of Philadelphia also organized a Tammany society and an annual Tammany festival. These traditions soon spread across America. The reason for Tammany’s popular status can be attributed to the need that patriotic colonists had to express a distinct ‘American’ identity, in place of their former European nationalities. Tammany, an American Indian, provided an apt symbol for patriotic Americans to identify with. Because of Philadelphia’s political significance during the founding of the United States of America, Tammany soon became a national symbol throughout much of the newly-formed country.” (Submitted on May 15, 2010.) 
 
Additional keywords. Tammany, Tammamend
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
Tamanend image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
4. Tamanend
Tamanend image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
5. Tamanend
Tamanend Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
6. Tamanend Monument
Tamanend image. Click for more information.
By Raymond Sandoval, circa April 95
7. Tamanend
Tamanend image. Click for more information.
By Raymond Sandoval, April 95
8. Tamanend
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,730 times since then and 77 times this year. Last updated on , by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   7, 8. submitted on , by Raymond Sandoval of Jemez Springs, New Mexico. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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