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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Plymouth Notch in Windsor County, Vermont — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Calvin Coolidge Homestead

 
 
Calvin Coolidge Homestead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 24, 1998
1. Calvin Coolidge Homestead Marker
Inscription. Calvin Coolidge Homestead has been designated a Registered National Historic Landmark. Under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1933 this site possesses exceptional value in commemorating or illustrating the history of the United States. U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service 1966.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 43° 32.118′ N, 72° 43.248′ W. Marker is in Plymouth Notch, Vermont, in Windsor County. Marker is on Calvin Coolidge Memorial Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Plymouth VT 05056, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Calvin Coolidge (within shouting distance of this marker); Vermont Gold Rush (approx. 4.2 miles away); Revolutionary War Campground on the Crown Point Road (approx. 4.3 miles away); Bridgewater World War I Monument (approx. 6 miles away); Bridgewater Veterans Memorial (approx. 6.1 miles away); Mount Holly Railroad History (approx. 6.7 miles away); Mt. Killington (approx. 9 miles away); Abby Maria Hemenway (approx. 9.6 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
Calvin Coolidge Homestead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 24, 1998
2. Calvin Coolidge Homestead Marker
The marker is in the front yard near the flag pole
 Historic Sites (State of Vermont) - Calvin Coolidge. (Submitted on October 21, 2015, by Kevin Craft of Bedford, Quebec.)
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
Calvin Coolidge Homestead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 24, 1998
3. Calvin Coolidge Homestead Marker
Coolidge Hall and the Summer White House
Calvin Coolidge Homestead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 24, 1998
4. Calvin Coolidge Homestead Marker
Coolidge Birthplace
The Coolidge Store image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 24, 1998
5. The Coolidge Store
Short Biography of Calvin Coolidge image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 24, 1998
6. Short Biography of Calvin Coolidge
Calvin Coolidge image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
7. Calvin Coolidge
This 1956 portrait of Calvin Coolidge by Joseph E. Burgess (after Ercole Cartotto) hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Americans expect their presidents to be active, which explains why Calvin Coolidge has been labeled by historians as the ‘quiet president’ and an ‘American enigma.’ Coolidge was propelled to national prominence, and the vice presidency, by his decision, while governor of Massachusetts, to fire striking officers in Boston's police strike of 1919, proclaiming, ’there is no right to strike against the public safety by anybody, anywhere, any time.’ Assuming the presidency after Warren Harding's death in 1923, Coolidge determined not to do anything to upset American prosperity. Upon election to the presidency, Coolidge, in his 1925 inaugural address the first on radio expressed his belief that ‘the people of America [should] … work less for the government and more for themselves.… That is the chief meaning of freedom.’ When Coolidge left office, political commentator Walter Lippmann wrote, ‘Surely no one will write of those years … that an aggressive president altered the destiny of the Republic. Yet … no one will write … that the Republic wished its destiny to be altered.’” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 357 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   7. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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